1858banner

Author Topic: Father-in-law's guns  (Read 3246 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jdurand

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 2735
  • Mostly Harmless
    • Company web site
Father-in-law's guns
« on: June 24, 2014, 12:49:07 AM »
My wife ran across an old picture of the guns she used to help her father make.  I never got to see any of them, don't know if he sold all of them or what.  When he died the state confiscated everything he owned before my wife was even notified that he died.  Wonderful California.

My wife did happen to have his old Bear bow, so I do have one thing of his.

In theory the picture is attached.
Standing on the edge of reality... (me)
Quando omni flunkus moritati (Red Green)
Let no man belong to another that can belong to himself. (Paracelsus)
All things are poison and nothing is without poison; only the dose makes a thing not a poison. (Paracelsus)
NRA Life Member, Gun Owners of California member

Offline mazo kid

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6610
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2014, 09:05:36 AM »
Those look to be well-crafted flinters! Unless your FIL died without a Will, I don't understand how the State could just take anything?!

Offline DD4lifeusmc

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 9226
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2014, 09:57:46 AM »
a lot of states have it set up so if you are on medicare / medicaid and have ran up a rather large hospital / drug bill, they can confiscate all your property when you die. Sell it / auction it to recoup their investment.
Normally your heirs are to have first opportunity to reimburse the state.
Just found this out a few months ago.
So if you or someone you know is on it, best to check it now.
Also you may want to start "giving" some of your stuff to your relatives and put small things in their name.
If you do a little here and there, you won't "trigger" the what are you doing scenario from the state.
Savings accounts nice to have for emergency and credit rating.
But if you can control yourself, better off just to have it under mattress.   I usually get a $100 or so in dollar coin each month and lock it in an ammo can (just hope we still use that type of money when I need it). Keep it in a secure place.
I also only keep $2 -$3000 in the checking at any time.
You may want to transfer your car (s) into your childrens name, or at least get a lien title.That you theoretically owe them, and they get the title  and vehicle if you don't pay them. You die, they claim the lien.
Look into it.
The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps.
General Alexander A. Vandergrift, USMC
to the Senate Naval Affairs Committee, 5 May 1946
------------
Marines Birthday  11/10/1775
USA birthday  7/4/1776

Offline jdurand

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 2735
  • Mostly Harmless
    • Company web site
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2014, 10:50:00 AM »
California added a proviso so they can now dig deeper for "repayment" and also broadened what counts as a reimbursable expense.  Note that the state doesn't provide an itemized bill, they determine what you owe and how much of your stuff they're taking (almost always all of it).

The Covered California (Obamacare) website also "helps" by signing people up for Medi-Cal (medicare) if you don't qualify for one of the other plans.  That happened to me at the end of last year and I'm STILL trying to cancel Medi-Cal completely.  The local Medi-Cal office doesn't have my records since the state bypassed the county offices so there's no real connection now between the people who manage Medi-Cal (county) and your records.  They said it's a mess as a lot of people didn't even qualify (like me) and got signed up anyway.  Also, you apparently can't tell your doctor to NOT use your Medi-Cal account even if you pay him cash.
Standing on the edge of reality... (me)
Quando omni flunkus moritati (Red Green)
Let no man belong to another that can belong to himself. (Paracelsus)
All things are poison and nothing is without poison; only the dose makes a thing not a poison. (Paracelsus)
NRA Life Member, Gun Owners of California member

Offline Captainkirk

  • Forum Caesar, Administrator Extraordinaire, Part-Time Gunslinger, Savior of used and abused, and neglected Remmies
  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 8055
  • Black Powder Nut & Remmy fanatic
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2014, 11:05:08 AM »
Wonderful California.

Again, there's your trouble. But don't feel bad. I think Illinois might just be worse!!!!!!
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"

Offline Classanr

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5217
  • BP, the original bug chaser!
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2014, 08:30:35 PM »
a lot of states have it set up so if you are on medicare / medicaid and have ran up a rather large hospital / drug bill, they can confiscate all your property when you die. Sell it / auction it to recoup their investment.
Normally your heirs are to have first opportunity to reimburse the state.
Just found this out a few months ago.
So if you or someone you know is on it, best to check it now.
Also you may want to start "giving" some of your stuff to your relatives and put small things in their name.
If you do a little here and there, you won't "trigger" the what are you doing scenario from the state.
Savings accounts nice to have for emergency and credit rating.
But if you can control yourself, better off just to have it under mattress.   I usually get a $100 or so in dollar coin each month and lock it in an ammo can (just hope we still use that type of money when I need it). Keep it in a secure place.
I also only keep $2 -$3000 in the checking at any time.
You may want to transfer your car (s) into your childrens name, or at least get a lien title.That you theoretically owe them, and they get the title  and vehicle if you don't pay them. You die, they claim the lien.
Look into it.

The "lookback" period is a minimum of 5 years, 7 in some states, even 10 in others.  In otherwords, if you gave it away 4 years 11 months, 30 days, 23 hours, 59 minutes ago, the government finds it and takes it back from the new owners.  The best bet is for the items to "get lost" and never be around when the grabbers show up.  The moment a person hits government medical care of any type, all assets ever owned from a minimum of 5 years ago are liened by the state.

This is one good reason to put everything (everything, even the money) in trust, starting now.  In 10 years, you have a chance that your loved ones can keep what you had.
Jim Beam me, Scotty!  Life here is more intelligent than I.

Offline Pat/Rick

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 302
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2014, 08:34:07 PM »
Look's like some fantastic rifle's! Does your wife remember how they were marked? Maybe a chance to buy one back if nothing else.

 (I'll not remark on the dealing's of  the  gooberment's kollektive).
Nothing expresses Liberty more, than the report of a rifle shot fired in the defense of Freedom.

Offline jdurand

  • Ultimate Forum Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 2735
  • Mostly Harmless
    • Company web site
Re: Father-in-law's guns
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2014, 11:52:08 PM »
The two of them made a small pile of these, my wife said she got the "fun" tasks like doing the rifling.  He probably signed them, Ollie Hurtley.  The stocks had storage in them for your balls, patches, etc.
Standing on the edge of reality... (me)
Quando omni flunkus moritati (Red Green)
Let no man belong to another that can belong to himself. (Paracelsus)
All things are poison and nothing is without poison; only the dose makes a thing not a poison. (Paracelsus)
NRA Life Member, Gun Owners of California member