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Author Topic: BP long guns  (Read 15380 times)

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Offline mazo kid

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2013, 11:11:29 AM »
I use black powder in mine altho a buddy uses about 10-12 gr. of Unique in his sometimes. You will get a better price from www.fsreloading.com if they have the mold in stock. I have a few Vetterlis and they range (IIRC) from about .428 to .435, not enough to worry about using lead bullets. You can also use 5744 for light loads, maybe 24 grains or so. Work up to it. The price of these guns and parts is really going up. I bought my first rifle for $75.00, got a cigar box of parts 10 years ago on ebay for $35.00. I see a complete bolt just sold for ~$140.00!

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2013, 12:19:04 PM »
I paid $250 for mine yesterday (with cleaning rod) but I gotta say, it's in really good condition.  They had two more in the store - one for $295 that had some metal surface issues, and another that had been converted to CF for $500 (why so much I do not know).
Mine has an extra firing pin under the butt plate that I'll probably use for the CF pin holder.
Thanks for the link to FS RELOADING.  Looks like a good company to deal with.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2013, 04:52:51 PM »
$250 with the cleaning rod is a very good price!  {?| The cleaning rods (if original) go for $125 alone, when you can find them. The rimfire firing pin under the buttplate was standard issue, and those extra pins go for $30 and up! Sears used to sell those guns (shortened) in the early 1900s for $5-7 as hunting rifles. You could still buy factory ammo then. Unless the gun was stored very poorly, they are usually in pretty decent condition with good shootable bores. Got any pictures? Hint, hint.

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2013, 06:03:16 PM »
I'll take some pics in the daylight. It's stamped M78 on the frame but M81 under the stock on the barrel.  I just slugged the bore twice and came up with approx. .414 bore and .429 groove (if I'm slugging it right).  My calipers are not high tech.  What does yours measure?
ooops...just reread your post:
 .428 to .435

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2013, 10:58:48 AM »
Vetterli .41 and Gallagher .54






Offline Len

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2013, 11:10:10 AM »
Very nice guns! And I suppose that nice sofa will increase in worth with some weapons grease spots.

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2013, 11:20:17 AM »
Yeah, a grease spot was a concern.  We recently had that sofa reupholstered at the Maine State Prison.
The Gallagher is a repro made by Erma in Germany.  It breaks open like a shotgun. The originals were made in .52 with a slow twist, something like 1-72".  Mine has a twist of 1-18".  From what I've read, they used German machinegun barrels for the repros.

« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 11:25:54 AM by Battis »

Offline Len

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2013, 11:54:09 AM »
Could you post a photo, or two, of the caps cabinet in the stock?

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #23 on: February 27, 2013, 12:26:40 PM »
This is what you meant...right? 



Offline Len

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2013, 12:47:34 PM »
This is what you meant...right? 




Yes! Very handy solution. Wonder if the Smith ever was supplied with that commodity? Someone on the forum might know.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #25 on: February 27, 2013, 01:59:31 PM »
Very nice looking gun! Some of the variations, and there were many, are: 1869: 33.1" barrel, loading gate cover, 11 round magazine and cross hatching on the fore end. 1871: 33.2" barrel, no loading gate cover, 11 round magazine, cross hatching on forearm.  1878: 33.8" barrel, no loading gate cover, re-inforcing pin in wrist, 12 round magazine, no cross hatching. 1881: 33.2" barrel, no loading gate cover, pin in stock wrist, no cross hatching, 12 round magazine. A tip if I may; if you hold the trigger back when closing the bolt, the firing pin will gently move forward....no need to dry fire. Also, when taking the bolt apart, turn the bolt handle while holding the bolt body. Spring tension is released and it makes it easy to take apart and reassemble.

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #26 on: February 27, 2013, 02:11:21 PM »
I was wondering how to release the pin without dryfiring. 
I did figure out how to take the bolt apart by twisting the body.  It's similar to my Mosin Nagant.
Does the pin in the stock ever have to come out?  I haven't removed the stock yet.  I read that the wrist pins were added to keep the stocks from splitting when slammed to the ground.

Len, under the cover (in the stock) is where a spare nipple was stored (missing on my rifle).  There was also one empty brass casing in mine.

Offline Len

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #27 on: February 27, 2013, 02:16:25 PM »
Battis,
how deep is the recess?

Offline Battis

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #28 on: February 27, 2013, 03:27:27 PM »
Approx. 5/8" to the cover recess.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: BP long guns
« Reply #29 on: February 27, 2013, 04:37:17 PM »
I can't think of any reason to take the wrist pin out.