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Author Topic: Boiling cylinders  (Read 622 times)

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Offline Rebel Craig

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Boiling cylinders
« on: January 15, 2020, 01:34:25 PM »
When Boiling a 1858 New Army cylinder How deep does the water need to be ?
Cylinder including nipples completely covered,or covered with the nipples sticking out ?

Offline G Dog

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2020, 01:37:47 PM »
Fully submerged for cleaning and why would you boil a cylinder?  They’re not potatoes.
"For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places".  
                                        Ephesians 6:12  (KJV)

Offline Hawg

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2020, 02:52:46 PM »
You don't need to boil them. Hot water out of the tap will work. So will cold water. Most people use hot tap water with Dawn dish washing soap.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline G Dog

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2020, 03:38:22 PM »
Heat makes stuff happen.  I always use very hot water and even have some dish-washer person gloves to help with that.  Speeds evaporation, too.

What’s with Dawn soap?  It’s universally recommended by experienced BP gun cleaners, so I use it too.   Is it low phosphate or what?  Good soap but why?

One More Time:  Remove the nipples and clean them separately.
"For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places".  
                                        Ephesians 6:12  (KJV)

Offline Hawg

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2020, 04:47:56 PM »
I use it because it's what we use in the house. When I was a kid mom used Joy so that's what I used back then. I don't think it really makes any difference. Soap is soap if you ask me and liquid dissolves better. Just an aside but my first powder flask was a Joy bottle.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline Rebel Craig

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2020, 05:28:32 PM »
Fully submerged for cleaning and why would you boil a cylinder?  They’re not potatoes.

I read a LOT of Post on This Forum before I ever shot my Pietta Remington New Army And read about boiling the cylinder in a sauce pan to clean it,as expressed by Gunslinger9378
and it seemed that quite a few Had tried this and reported good results but I never read where the question I Just asked was fully addressed.


Offline Miguel Loco

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2020, 06:18:11 PM »
Fully submerged for cleaning and why would you boil a cylinder?  They’re not potatoes.

I read a LOT of Post on This Forum before I ever shot my Pietta Remington New Army And read about boiling the cylinder in a sauce pan to clean it,as expressed by Gunslinger9378
and it seemed that quite a few Had tried this and reported good results but I never read where the question I Just asked was fully addressed.

It probably would work very well. But after you try straight soap and water you may think it's a little overkill. The plain soap and water does an exceptional job. I'd suggest trying it to see how it works for you..... I've never seen a need to go beyond the basic way.
-Mick
"a dios rogando y con el mazo dando"

Offline G Dog

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2020, 06:56:56 PM »
Oh well, Johnnie then, …  earrz.   Dear Johnnie must be taken cum grano salis.

What Miguel said is a sound approach.  It's easy and effective.
"For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places".  
                                        Ephesians 6:12  (KJV)

Offline Rebel Craig

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2020, 07:20:22 PM »
Fully submerged for cleaning and why would you boil a cylinder?  They’re not potatoes.

I read a LOT of Post on This Forum before I ever shot my Pietta Remington New Army And read about boiling the cylinder in a sauce pan to clean it,as expressed by Gunslinger9378
and it seemed that quite a few Had tried this and reported good results but I never read where the question I Just asked was fully addressed.

It probably would work very well. But after you try straight soap and water you may think it's a little overkill. The plain soap and water does an exceptional job. I'd suggest trying it to see how it works for you..... I've never seen a need to go beyond the basic way.

Oh I agree ,whatever way is the easiest and fastest
I Shot a cylinder full out of my Revolver last week and tried Gunslinger9378 ,Method of cleaning .
I used a small sauce pan and put the cylinder in the boiling water but I only used enough water to come halfway up the cylinder ,And turned off the heat as soon as started to boil seemed to be clean but I was just wondering if most who boil the cylinder use enough water to cover the entire cylinder.
For the Less than 10 minutes the cylinder was in the hot water I took the revolver and holding it upside down with the muzzle held at a angle where hot water from the sink would run down the barrel only and not get in bolt hole .
Then I used a Glock Cleaning Rod with a plastic brush that I tore off pieces of paper towel and wrapped around the brush and made sure the barrel was dry and then put some vegetable oil on a piece of paper towel and run it through the barrel.
Did not oil the inside of the cylinder .It was already dry
Lightly oiled the outside and was done,clean and no rust.
It seemed very fast and easy to me,took the longest time tearing off different sheets of bounty paper towel and wrapping around the brush and having the paper slip off the brush !
The next time I shoot it and clean it I will be using a couple of bore Mops to keep from having to change the paper towel or them slipping off the brush.


Offline G Dog

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2020, 08:59:04 PM »
Old T-shirt material makes good patches and on the right size jag will stay on as long as you want.  Assorted mops and an old toothbrush are shooter's friends.   I use paper towels too but only in the early really dirty phase.

For Remingtons, a patched .22 jag works well for the center cylinder hole.  Just sayin.
"For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places".  
                                        Ephesians 6:12  (KJV)

Offline Hawg

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2020, 09:50:09 PM »
I don't use patches anymore. I only use bore mops for the bore and chambers. If you're going to boil the cylinder you might as well pull the grips and boil the whole thing. 
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline ssb73q

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2020, 06:29:07 AM »
Hi Craig, totally cover the cylinder nipples. When the water has been boiling for a minute or so, add a dish detergent. Boil for a couple of minutes more, then remove and dry the cylinders.

When Johnnie first told us of his boiling method, I was very skeptical. I have dozens of extra cylinders for many of my BP revolvers where I was always looking for a better method of cylinder cleaning compared to nipple removal and wire brushing. Johnnie's method saves me a lot of time and works well. If you use the boiling method, put anti seize on the nipples before using the boiling method. My cylinders have been boiled many times with no ill effects to the cylinders. The anti seize keeps the nipples easy to remove if necessary.

BTW, I take one addition step after boiling cylinders. I put them in the kitchen oven at 250 dF for 1/2 hour to ensure that all the water is gone, even residual water left in the nipple threads. A light spray with Ballistol and the cylinders are then put away.

I disagreed with a lot of Johnnie's suggestions, but boiling cylinders is a good time saver.

Regards,
Richard

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2020, 12:50:37 PM »
I think the reason for using Dawn (or any dishwashing detergent) is because it cuts through grease better than soap.

Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2020, 01:25:23 AM »
  I'll have to try the boiling the cylinder trick because I always find it difficult to get the percussion cap residue off around the nipples.
Brad Potter, hardware junky.

Offline Hawg

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2020, 07:10:55 AM »
  I'll have to try the boiling the cylinder trick because I always find it difficult to get the percussion cap residue off around the nipples.

Toothbrush or if it's really bad a soft brass brush.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.