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Author Topic: Boiling cylinders  (Read 399 times)

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Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2020, 12:32:01 PM »
  I've tried that Hawg but it's really difficult to get all the cap crud out of the recesses where the nipples reside. I usually resort to removing the nipples to get all the residue cleaned out. Perhaps I'm just looking for the easy way and it doesn't exist. I'll at least give the boiling routine a try.
Brad Potter, hardware junky.

Offline Len

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2020, 02:39:38 PM »
I did boil the cylinders, but dear squaw didn't approve, thought the skillets gave a funny taste to the stew. Started using hot tap water and detergent, Just as good. And as far as I know, the native Americans just threw their pieces into the creek overnight. We affecionadis seem to overdo it.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2020, 03:26:05 PM »
I have never boiled any cylinders, but have considered it. As I recall, Johnnie NEVER removed a single nipple from any of his many cylinders despite several warnings.

Offline Hawg

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2020, 04:34:53 PM »
As I recall, Johnnie NEVER removed a single nipple from any of his many cylinders despite several warnings.

I can't said nuffin. I never removed any of mine either. I don't even own a revolver nipple wrench. I have a rifle wrench I've used two times since 1980. I fell for the hype around 1985 and replaced the factory nipple with a Hot Shot which eroded out 10 years later. I replaced it with the original factory nipple which was still in it when I sold it around 2009.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2020, 08:01:15 PM »
Yep, hype. If the nipples are not battered and are firing well, then why replace them? I have removed some on my guns, but never replaced any that were still serviceable.

Offline prof marvel

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2020, 01:55:50 AM »

BTW, I take one addition step after boiling cylinders. I put them in the kitchen oven at 250 dF for 1/2 hour to ensure that all the water is gone, even residual water left in the nipple threads. A light spray with Ballistol and the cylinders are then put away.

I disagreed with a lot of Johnnie's suggestions, but boiling cylinders is a good time saver.

Regards,
Richard

Greetings My Dear Richard & Other Friends

if you choose to bake your gun ( cylinders, whatever) make certain you have an accurate thermometer.
Keep the temperature below 300 deg F.

heating between 350 deg F and 450 deg F  ( depending on the exact steel formula) you are likely to encounter a phenomenon
 one runs the very real risk of running into  "tempered martensite embrittlement"

1095 for example shows a fairly dramatic drop in toughness when heated above about 325-340 degrees F and doesn't fully recover for a while.
4340 is a classic example for tempered martensite embrittlement, and is a low alloy steel,

to quote a knifemaker who I read, and mostly understand ....mostly...

"Tempering means "squeezing" carbon out of the martensite, it makes carbides, at the expense of the martensite's carbon. Increasing temperatures have those carbide growing and merging together up to a point when they start creating preferential paths of crack propagation, hence embrittlement.
Under 400° F the carbides are so small and well dispersed that actually reinforce the matrix, hence the peak of toughness...Actually it is not a peak, it is the best strenght/toughness ratio.
After those temperatures the carbide driven brittleness is being balanced by the softness of the martensite, still the rise in toughness is slowed.
At the TME you still have martensite, with the worst carbide condition, it is the "walley" of the toughness function.
Then you are in the spheroidizing region...toughness rises again because you don't have martensite anymore, just ferrite and carbides "

The strange part is that a "one step tempering process" leavesmany steels subject to the "tempered martensite embrittlement" phenomenon.

So, I suggest keeping your frames and cylinders below 300 F . theres no reason to try and brown them after all, they aren't Pork Roasts.

yhs
prof marvel
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Offline ssb73q

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Re: Boiling cylinders
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2020, 06:39:46 AM »
Hi Prof, my understanding is that all Uberti and Pietta revolvers use low carbon steel for barrels, frames, and cylinders. Little carbon for hardening. I often nitre blue that steel at 600 dF with no observable heat effect issues. Springs and other parts like loading lever, arbor, bolt, hand, and hammer are harder steels that may be heat affected by nitre bluing. Never noticed a problem drying both frame, cylinder and internal parts in the oven at 250 dF.

However, thanks for the warning.

Regards,
Richard