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Author Topic: No 24506  (Read 2620 times)

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Offline Hawg

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2019, 02:41:30 PM »
I have owned a good many original guns with stock/grip repairs. Most were done with pins, nails, wire or screws. Some were done with brass or iron plates, some with rawhide. All of them were unsightly. It seems to me that back in the day putting something back in service superseded looks. Making nice looking repairs is more of a modern thing.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #46 on: October 28, 2019, 04:30:55 PM »
My dear Hawg, I do not want to be rude, but you are a Remington replica man. Racing and myself are Remington original men. Though we live in a galaxy far far away, we still want to keep that heritage alive after some 160+ years. Epoxi is not, repeat not, period stuff.
Racing has revived a heirloom from dazumal. We talked ways and means about how to repair a cracked original grip, preferably using some period methods. Epoxi is not an option, repeat not an option.
As far as I know, there might be some Indian knowledge of resin from trees, used to glue feathers and such to arrows. But, methinks, a craftsman back then would have resorted to screws.
Yours sincerely // Len

Not to be rude but he did say he used epoxy and wood dust. M__
My dear Hawg, thanks for the info. Missed it. My bad. Shame on Modern-Epoxi-Racing.

Len
Please read again and come back on the matter.
The phrase epoxy was used as people thus recognize what we�re talking about. Resin..most will not understand,have no concept of.
So no shame on me what so ever. Main component of that resin is Tightbond. Hide glue. Look it up. I keep it around to repair my plethora of guitars and thus know how it works,well.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 08:37:34 AM by Smokey »
DVC - 2020

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #47 on: October 28, 2019, 04:48:52 PM »
I have owned a good many original guns with stock/grip repairs. Most were done with pins, nails, wire or screws. Some were done with brass or iron plates, some with rawhide. All of them were unsightly. It seems to me that back in the day putting something back in service superseded looks. Making nice looking repairs is more of a modern thing.

Can�t but agree. As you can gather i look around quite a bit,auctions and what not,and often "old" repairs looks like a drunken sailor�s been at it,at high seas.
Then again Hawg,back in the day these guns weren�t antiques either but merely just..guns,and most of them just had a practical purpose. Ie;function before form.

A lot can happen in the life span of a gun,and sometimes do. To the point where repairs pulled sometimes IMO would have been left better alone. As was.
But..who am i to complain. Most of it,if not all,can be reversed with a little know-how,elbow grease and attitude.

A project like No 24506 is therefore a "sweet" undertaking really. The wear�s in the right place and we know how to deal with it,bringing the gun back to operable status again - to new spec conditions even.
If you recall my 36cal Beals..that�s quite a few steps down that ladder,and it can STILL be done.

Speaking of which. Have given that there with the lack of rifling of that Beals of mine a good deal of thought and believe i�m going to order a couple of rifling buttons from the russians.
They can these days be had at like approx 50$ a pop why there IMO isn�t all that much to lose.
You basically have that rifling button ordered to spec. Ie;you get to set the parameters 100% for what the button delivered holds. Diameter,width,twist et al. The full 9 yards YOU spec.

Mark,these buttons are primarily made for modern day n era guns rendering that pushing one through a piece of mild steel like in our case should be a rather simple deal.
The thing to keep in mind is to start out with a piece of axle of ample proportions as far as outer diameter. To keep tolerances on "your" side all said and done a 40mm piece of steel is recommended for a 36 or 44 cal cap n ball revolver.

In other words,push that button through a pre drilled hole done on the lathe then set the thing up,still 40mm outer diameter,on the press and let the rifling button do its thing.
Then turn the thing down to become a liner on the lathe to be installed into the original,now bored out,barrel.

I�m thinking as such that as that liner will be a separate component up until the "last leg" of the operation i can back down at basically any given time if i feel the outcome gets questionable.
Last leg would be boring the existing barrel out to a given dimension and turn the outer diameter down of the "liner" to be approx 1-2/100mm under...to be installed slip fit with Loctite as glue.
Then TIG weld the ends shut...and noone will ever know what happend.  {L*

The only thing lacking in this case will be the progressive rifling but to be honest given the circumstances that i can live without.
What i�ve got in mind is a button of 1:16 twist btw.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 08:37:43 AM by Smokey »
DVC - 2020

Offline Len

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2019, 01:47:06 PM »

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #49 on: January 22, 2020, 03:21:51 PM »
The various pts..it´s all coming together.
Remains a little polish work on the cyl,barrel and rammer but that said..getting there and indeed time for the blueing bath.

Now.
Here´s a tip for those of you into performance. That it sure won´t hurt to have the various chambers of the cylinder index and center over the barrel...
USB,or similar,"inspection cameras" are dirt cheap these days and can be turned into a REAL valuable tool as far as setting/tuning the timing of the gun.
Just play around with bolt performance and fit ´til happy.
Worth every penny.

Mark. The wear on the cylinder which made the gap end up around the 1mm mark i´ve handled by welding up the rear of the cyl with a TIG welder. Works very very well and is a WAY better alternative than recutting the barrel for fit.
DVC - 2020

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #50 on: February 01, 2020, 01:38:58 PM »
Well lads,No 24 506 is reporting for duty,Sir.

Per usual...salts only @ approx 360-370degC.

End shake reset,timing reset,it locks up as you won´t believe...

In short No 24 506 is ready for another 150 years of service.
At your service Sir. &j(
DVC - 2020

Offline Hawg

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #51 on: February 01, 2020, 04:04:07 PM »
Very nice. I just noticed the brass pinched front sight. Was there a reason for using brass?
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #52 on: February 01, 2020, 04:23:17 PM »
Nope brother.
Not pinched. Dovetailed,and as stock as they come.. Brass as the stocker is.
The actual "sight" tho is by me. The stock jobbie was about worn to c*ap....
DVC - 2020

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #53 on: February 01, 2020, 04:34:32 PM »
Yeah.
No 125 904 next to it. My "goto". My trusted "ol´ yeller"...
Uhu. Need to rinse the wells of No 24 506. True that.
That said.
Life´s hard... {:( )L$ )L$
Hm.
Just a couple of several under this roof. DAMN these some fine revolvers. 150+yrs later still to be leaned upon.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2020, 04:40:18 PM by Racing »
DVC - 2020

Offline Hawg

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #54 on: February 01, 2020, 09:25:11 PM »
Nope brother.
Not pinched. Dovetailed,and as stock as they come.. Brass as the stocker is.
The actual "sight" tho is by me. The stock jobbie was about worn to c*ap....



That's what is known as a pinched sight. They changed from a brass German silver plated dovetailed cone to a steel pinched sight that was screwed in in 1863. Perhaps the original cone was worn down so much it appeared to be pinched?

This is an original that has lost it's plating.



Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #55 on: February 02, 2020, 04:59:30 AM »
Ah.
I thought you were just thinking of the pinched stocker for the later ones that screw in.
DVC - 2020

Offline Miguel Loco

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #56 on: February 02, 2020, 08:54:34 AM »
She's coming along nicely.....:)
-Mick
"a dios rogando y con el mazo dando"

Offline Len

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #57 on: February 02, 2020, 10:16:55 AM »
Really nice job Racing! And I like the grip crack showing ___ underlines the antiquity of it. Did you install any reinforcement on it's back side?

Offline Hawg

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #58 on: February 02, 2020, 01:47:55 PM »
Ah.
I thought you were just thinking of the pinched stocker for the later ones that screw in.

Is what I'm saying. They didn't make the pinched ones out of brass nor did they make any pinched ones that were dovetailed. Beautiful gun tho.
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for thou art crunchy, and tasteth good with ketchup.

Offline prof marvel

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #59 on: February 03, 2020, 02:21:29 AM »
I have owned a good many original guns with stock/grip repairs. Most were done with pins, nails, wire or screws. Some were done with brass or iron plates, some with rawhide. All of them were unsightly. It seems to me that back in the day putting something back in service superseded looks. Making nice looking repairs is more of a modern thing.

Can�t but agree. As you can gather i look around quite a bit,auctions and what not,and often "old" repairs looks like a drunken sailor�s been at it,at high seas.
Then again Hawg,back in the day these guns weren�t antiques either but merely just..guns,and most of them just had a practical purpose. Ie;function before form.

A lot can happen in the life span of a gun,and sometimes do. To the point where repairs pulled sometimes IMO would have been left better alone. As was.
But..who am i to complain. Most of it,if not all,can be reversed with a little know-how,elbow grease and attitude.

A project like No 24506 is therefore a "sweet" undertaking really. The wear�s in the right place and we know how to deal with it,bringing the gun back to operable status again - to new spec conditions even.
If you recall my 36cal Beals..that�s quite a few steps down that ladder,and it can STILL be done.

Speaking of which. Have given that there with the lack of rifling of that Beals of mine a good deal of thought and believe i�m going to order a couple of rifling buttons from the russians.
They can these days be had at like approx 50$ a pop why there IMO isn�t all that much to lose.
You basically have that rifling button ordered to spec. Ie;you get to set the parameters 100% for what the button delivered holds. Diameter,width,twist et al. The full 9 yards YOU spec.

Mark,these buttons are primarily made for modern day n era guns rendering that pushing one through a piece of mild steel like in our case should be a rather simple deal.
The thing to keep in mind is to start out with a piece of axle of ample proportions as far as outer diameter. To keep tolerances on "your" side all said and done a 40mm piece of steel is recommended for a 36 or 44 cal cap n ball revolver.

In other words,push that button through a pre drilled hole done on the lathe then set the thing up,still 40mm outer diameter,on the press and let the rifling button do its thing.
Then turn the thing down to become a liner on the lathe to be installed into the original,now bored out,barrel.

I�m thinking as such that as that liner will be a separate component up until the "last leg" of the operation i can back down at basically any given time if i feel the outcome gets questionable.
Last leg would be boring the existing barrel out to a given dimension and turn the outer diameter down of the "liner" to be approx 1-2/100mm under...to be installed slip fit with Loctite as glue.
Then TIG weld the ends shut...and noone will ever know what happend.  {L*

The only thing lacking in this case will be the progressive rifling but to be honest given the circumstances that i can live without.
What i�ve got in mind is a button of 1:16 twist btw.

Greetings Racing-
Since your replydisappeared in the black hole, I quoted the entire hing here , for the ease of everybody else to see it.

but I am actually replying to point out that in addition to the norovirus, the chinese are exporting button rifling stuff via ebay.
I'll post a link when I come across it again... :-)
yhs
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