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Author Topic: No 24506  (Read 1005 times)

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Offline Hawg

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2019, 02:41:30 PM »
I have owned a good many original guns with stock/grip repairs. Most were done with pins, nails, wire or screws. Some were done with brass or iron plates, some with rawhide. All of them were unsightly. It seems to me that back in the day putting something back in service superseded looks. Making nice looking repairs is more of a modern thing.
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Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #46 on: October 28, 2019, 04:30:55 PM »
My dear Hawg, I do not want to be rude, but you are a Remington replica man. Racing and myself are Remington original men. Though we live in a galaxy far far away, we still want to keep that heritage alive after some 160+ years. Epoxi is not, repeat not, period stuff.
Racing has revived a heirloom from dazumal. We talked ways and means about how to repair a cracked original grip, preferably using some period methods. Epoxi is not an option, repeat not an option.
As far as I know, there might be some Indian knowledge of resin from trees, used to glue feathers and such to arrows. But, methinks, a craftsman back then would have resorted to screws.
Yours sincerely // Len

Not to be rude but he did say he used epoxy and wood dust. M__
My dear Hawg, thanks for the info. Missed it. My bad. Shame on Modern-Epoxi-Racing.

Len
Please read again and come back on the matter.
The phrase epoxy was used as people thus recognize what we´re talking about. Resin..most will not understand,have no concept of.
So no shame on me what so ever. Main component of that resin is Tightbond. Hide glue. Look it up. I keep it around to repair my plethora of guitars and thus know how it works,well.
DVC - 2019

Offline Racing

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #47 on: October 28, 2019, 04:48:52 PM »
I have owned a good many original guns with stock/grip repairs. Most were done with pins, nails, wire or screws. Some were done with brass or iron plates, some with rawhide. All of them were unsightly. It seems to me that back in the day putting something back in service superseded looks. Making nice looking repairs is more of a modern thing.

Can´t but agree. As you can gather i look around quite a bit,auctions and what not,and often "old" repairs looks like a drunken sailor´s been at it,at high seas.
Then again Hawg,back in the day these guns weren´t antiques either but merely just..guns,and most of them just had a practical purpose. Ie;function before form.

A lot can happen in the life span of a gun,and sometimes do. To the point where repairs pulled sometimes IMO would have been left better alone. As was.
But..who am i to complain. Most of it,if not all,can be reversed with a little know-how,elbow grease and attitude.

A project like No 24506 is therefore a "sweet" undertaking really. The wear´s in the right place and we know how to deal with it,bringing the gun back to operable status again - to new spec conditions even.
If you recall my 36cal Beals..that´s quite a few steps down that ladder,and it can STILL be done.

Speaking of which. Have given that there with the lack of rifling of that Beals of mine a good deal of thought and believe i´m going to order a couple of rifling buttons from the russians.
They can these days be had at like approx 50$ a pop why there IMO isn´t all that much to lose.
You basically have that rifling button ordered to spec. Ie;you get to set the parameters 100% for what the button delivered holds. Diameter,width,twist et al. The full 9 yards YOU spec.

Mark,these buttons are primarily made for modern day n era guns rendering that pushing one through a piece of mild steel like in our case should be a rather simple deal.
The thing to keep in mind is to start out with a piece of axle of ample proportions as far as outer diameter. To keep tolerances on "your" side all said and done a 40mm piece of steel is recommended for a 36 or 44 cal cap n ball revolver.

In other words,push that button through a pre drilled hole done on the lathe then set the thing up,still 40mm outer diameter,on the press and let the rifling button do its thing.
Then turn the thing down to become a liner on the lathe to be installed into the original,now bored out,barrel.

I´m thinking as such that as that liner will be a separate component up until the "last leg" of the operation i can back down at basically any given time if i feel the outcome gets questionable.
Last leg would be boring the existing barrel out to a given dimension and turn the outer diameter down of the "liner" to be approx 1-2/100mm under...to be installed slip fit with Loctite as glue.
Then TIG weld the ends shut...and noone will ever know what happend.  {L*

The only thing lacking in this case will be the progressive rifling but to be honest given the circumstances that i can live without.
What i´ve got in mind is a button of 1:16 twist btw.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 04:54:22 PM by Racing »
DVC - 2019

Offline Len

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Re: No 24506
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2019, 01:47:06 PM »

Len
Please read again and come back on the matter.
The phrase epoxy was used as people thus recognize what we´re talking about. Resin..most will not understand,have no concept of.
So no shame on me what so ever. Main component of that resin is Tightbond. Hide glue. Look it up. I keep it around to repair my plethora of guitars and thus know how it works,well.
[/quote]
My dear Racing, why didn't you say so from the start. I have Tightbond and use it frequently in my job. I also have different brands of epoxi, but have come to phase them out, as I haven't found them reliable. Tightbond is a great resin, though I mostly rely on Cascol (mainly due to my customer's requirements). Shame cusion withdrawn !