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Author Topic: The oldest company in the United States  (Read 17224 times)

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Offline M9Powell

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2015, 02:34:50 PM »
 Nice  (T^

Offline Prospector

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2015, 09:46:45 AM »
I thought that Revere Copper Company, started by the famous patriot Paul Revere in 1801, may be older, but it looks like it has changed so much over the years it is not considered the same company.  It is now Revere Copper Products.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revere_Copper_Company



Offline Len

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2015, 01:59:36 PM »
I had my hands on a First gen Remington typewriter (1875), the oldest of their products I've personally handled. The price tag was a little hefty for me though.

Is that a typewriter or a tommy gun (thinking Chicago Typewriter here) ???

Offline Classanr

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2015, 03:14:54 PM »
Not to intentionally confuse things more, but "Type-writer" was once a brand name of a competitor, the patent sold, with Remington doing the manufacturing.  Read this first, then my QWERTY comment after:

"The first typewriter to be commercially successful was invented in 1868 by Americans Christopher Latham Sholes, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, although Sholes soon disowned the machine and refused to use, or even to recommend it. The working prototype was made by the machinist Matthias Schwalbach.[14][15][16] The patent (US 79,265) was sold for $12,000 to Densmore and Yost, who made an agreement with E. Remington and Sons (then famous as a manufacturer of sewing machines) to commercialize the machine as the Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer. This was the origin of the term typewriter. Remington began production of its first typewriter on March 1, 1873, in Ilion, New York. It had a QWERTY keyboard layout, which because of the machine's success, was slowly adopted by other typewriter manufacturers."

OK, now my discussion on the QWERTY layout.  This was NOT the original keyboard layout.  Still another competing company installed return springs on their machine to get the keys to drop down off the platten faster so the typists could get documents out faster.  The Remingtons had the annoying tendency for the keys to jam up at the platten (and anybody who took "Typing" in school on manuals knows exactly the frustration of which I, uh, type).  Rather than go the route of expensive retooling (their machine depended on gravity alone to get one key out of the way of the next), they engaged a time-motion study person to determine a way to slow down their customers, thus prevent key jamming.  As a result of intentional study, the QWERTY keyboard is scientifically the worst possible key layout for human hands, designed to intentionally slow you down.  Guys, it is NOT your fault!

DVORAK is the best (was used extensively in WWII - much faster to teach raw recruits to get 60+wpm).

Annually, thousands of people get carpel-tunnel as a direct result of QWERTY.  During the 1970s DVORAK keyboards experienced a modicum of excitement along with the introduction of micro-computers, but that was the same period when IBM introduced the Selectric (the electric machine with the replacable type ball) and gave them away to schools free with the QWERTY keyboard, the inertia of educational mass doomed us all to the scientifically-worst-possible layout designed to slow us all down.  How much so?  In speed typing contest, DVORAK keyboards are banned!
« Last Edit: September 16, 2015, 03:21:05 PM by Classanr »
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Offline old fogey

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2015, 04:11:06 PM »
That's some noggin-numbing in-depth knowledge right there, Classanr! Thankee kindly, sir! |::

Offline PaleHawkDown

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2015, 04:24:27 PM »
I really just always wanted one because I'm a former full-time, current freelance, newspaper guy and I love Remington. I always figured that if I lived in those days I'd own a small town paper have a Remington at my hip, a Remington rifle and/or shotgun hanging over my editorial desk, and a Remington typewriter.

Offline Prospector

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2015, 05:10:04 PM »
I remember when there was a resurgence of the DVORAK keyboards.  If I remember correctly, it was in the early days of the Microcomputer, before the IBM PC came out and again locked in the QWERTY for all time.  You can still get a dedicated Dvorak keyboard so that you do not have to set it up in the control panel or get add-on drivers.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2015, 06:41:50 PM by Prospector »

Offline Classanr

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2015, 06:20:36 PM »
I really just always wanted one because I'm a former full-time, current freelance, newspaper guy and I love Remington. I always figured that if I lived in those days I'd own a small town paper have a Remington at my hip, a Remington rifle and/or shotgun hanging over my editorial desk, and a Remington typewriter.

If you do, get an early model before the QWERTY.  That will *really* impress the people who see your collection.
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Offline jdurand

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #23 on: September 16, 2015, 06:52:28 PM »
Same reason that telephone touch pads are upside down from a calculator.  Accountants would dial phones faster than the network could keep up.
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Offline Classanr

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2015, 08:56:26 PM »
Same reason that telephone touch pads are upside down from a calculator.  Accountants would dial phones faster than the network could keep up.

Ever been inside one of the old rotary switch rooms?  When touch tone came live, tone became an option on the handset.  However, the Central Office still had rotary units in service, so the tones had to be reconverted to pulse, then sent to the switches.  A CO switch room was like a typing pool:  clackity clackity clack clack clack.  Lots of little sparks on the contacts slowly going bad.  Really cool when you turned off the lights.  Kinda like a room of hundreds of telegraph keys with a sparkler light show.  There was one rotor *set* for each phone line.  If you were on an 8-party line, you all shared one rotor set.  4-party, 2-party, and then verrrry expensive private line where you had your own dedicated rotary set in the switch room.  BTW, each switch set had 4 or 5 rotors, engaging in sequence as you dialed each number.  When you wanted to phone somebody in a different exchange, you used an operator to get outside your exchange.  Then the companies added more rotors for "direct dial" within your set of exchanges.  Long distance still required an operator.  Finally, area codes - which were the boon of digital switch systems.

Here's an old-time video explanation:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZePwin92cI

That switch setup is actually newer technology than the switch house we had in Guilford Maine.  When the switch house in Maine was upgraded to digital, the entire content was shipped to North Dakota for a small town there to "upgrade". (?^

Keep in mind that the telephone and the typewriter both went commercial very close in our country's history, making communication leaps in proportion to what we see today with email when compared to fax.
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Offline jdurand

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2015, 09:00:11 PM »
And the Stoger switch used in those offices was invented by a funeral home owner who was loosing business to another home because the operator referred all calls over there.
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Offline Classanr

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #26 on: September 17, 2015, 09:20:41 AM »
And the Stoger switch used in those offices was invented by a funeral home owner who was loosing business to another home because the operator referred all calls over there.

I did not know that one.
Haha, maybe the first practical employment of an electrical robot to replace a human.  Well, maybe the doorbell to replace a butler came first, but that does not fully replace the butler.

DJ, your post is a good example of Collective Knowledge where the sum of the parts is greater than the whole.
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Offline Bishop Creek

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2015, 07:17:21 PM »
I really just always wanted one because I'm a former full-time, current freelance, newspaper guy and I love Remington. I always figured that if I lived in those days I'd own a small town paper have a Remington at my hip, a Remington rifle and/or shotgun hanging over my editorial desk, and a Remington typewriter.

In my first job out of high school in the late 1960s, I worked at our small hometown newspaper and used not only a typewriter, but a Lino-type machine, typing stories in hot lead that when cool, were then locked into a form for printing. Also ran a proofing press loaded with ink and a router for taking wood away from mounted zinc photo engraved cuts for advertising. All of this equipment is now on display at our local museum and when I told my now college aged kids that I actually used that equipment at one time, they laughed.  ->i

Offline jolt_34500

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2015, 12:29:03 AM »
The telephone switch brings back something for me, though I am only 43, my mother worked as a long distance operator for New England Telephone & Telegraph. I can vaguely remember seeing the switch boards at the CO. I also remember one of the techs, everyone called him "Sparky" showing us kids the automatic switches that were in another part of the building, Anyway, before I got my 1858 revolver and in fact before I considered BP, I was video surfing youtube one night came across a bunch of video from the 1950's introducing the Remington Rand Univac computer.
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Offline PaleHawkDown

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Re: The oldest company in the United States
« Reply #29 on: September 21, 2015, 12:36:12 PM »
I really just always wanted one because I'm a former full-time, current freelance, newspaper guy and I love Remington. I always figured that if I lived in those days I'd own a small town paper have a Remington at my hip, a Remington rifle and/or shotgun hanging over my editorial desk, and a Remington typewriter.

In my first job out of high school in the late 1960s, I worked at our small hometown newspaper and used not only a typewriter, but a Lino-type machine, typing stories in hot lead that when cool, were then locked into a form for printing. Also ran a proofing press loaded with ink and a router for taking wood away from mounted zinc photo engraved cuts for advertising. All of this equipment is now on display at our local museum and when I told my now college aged kids that I actually used that equipment at one time, they laughed.  ->i

I worked at a paper that had long ago outsourced their printing...to a company with a press built in the 1950s. We still had the linotype machine and the metal printing plate maker in the back room, and both had been in operation as late as the 1990s.
The press itself was a cast iron turn-of-the-century monstrosity  approximately six feet long by four and-a-half feet wide by four feet tall that could be run by a belt or by hand and could only do one side of a gatefold at a time. It hadn't seen action since the early '70s, and still had the last plate on it ready to go. Considering how fat those papers were back then in that small town, it must have been an all-week process to print all the necessary copies. I imagine every day was a major deadline for the staff, even though the paper was a weekly. It sat in the lobby as a bit of a museum piece.

When I started everyone had long ago moved to the plastic plates, but we were still cutting out stories and hand pasting dummies to be turned into plates. I loved it because it gave you a chance to notice those errors you never see on a screen and fix them before going to press with nothing more than a pair of scissors and a glue stick.

Every office I've ever worked at was a hodgepodge of obsolete equipment, and almost none have their own press anymore. I can only think of six in the entire state that have them, and they print the papers for everyone else.

The cub scouts once requested a tour of the newspaper office and I could not get it through the scoutmaster's head that the office was one 20x30 room with four seven-year-old IMac 3Gs each manned by a refugee of the Jolly Roger.