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Author Topic: When flintlocks go bad  (Read 8387 times)

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Offline ssb73q

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2016, 11:39:07 AM »
Hi, I remember seeing a reference that the ultimate test of a flintlock is if it can be fired upside down. I have tried that test with my flintlocks a number of times only to see that test fail. Guess I still have a lot to learn using flintlocks.

Regards,
Richard
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Offline Tom-ADC

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2016, 04:28:02 PM »
Never had the patience for one, probably needed a better one then I had.
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Offline Cross Plains Drifter

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #17 on: August 05, 2016, 05:56:34 AM »
the ignition time on my Pedersoli Kentucky .50 is amazing when the load is rammed home but not packed like i'm trying to knock the breech plug out.......the "click" of the flint striking the frizzen is almost simultaneous with the ball leaving the muzzle.....it's as fast as any sidelock percussion rifle I've ever owned (which would be 5 or 6).

the only changes I made were hardening (kasenit) and tempering the frizzen, and chamfering the touch hole.
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Offline Classanr

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2016, 07:01:19 AM »
the ignition time on my Pedersoli Kentucky .50 is amazing when the load is rammed home but not packed like i'm trying to knock the breech plug out.......the "click" of the flint striking the frizzen is almost simultaneous with the ball leaving the muzzle.....it's as fast as any sidelock percussion rifle I've ever owned (which would be 5 or 6).

the only changes I made were hardening (kasenit) and tempering the frizzen, and chamfering the touch hole.

After ramming, but before priming, do you run the pick through the the touch hole?
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Offline Cross Plains Drifter

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2016, 09:03:51 PM »
nope......I pick the vent after firing......load the powder charge, and give the stock a good "rap" with my hand heel with the vent pointing downward-ish........then bump again after charging the pan before dropping the frizzen (held upright to get flash powder into the hole).

my chamfer is fairly large but shallow.

if i'm ever out with someone that can hold my cell-phone i'll get a vid of the ignition time and post it.
Democracy is 2 Wolves and a Lamb voting on what's for dinner.....
Liberty is a well armed Lamb !

Offline AZshooter

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Re: When flintlocks go bad
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2017, 04:09:59 AM »
Thanks Mazo for that tip.  I will see if I can polish the internal parts too, if I can figure out how to get the lock apart (and more importantly, back together).
Step One:  Buy A lock spring vise.  You may think you can disassemble and reassemble a lock without one & not wreck the spring ... but you can't.   They're not that expensive, and if you have only one flintlock, a lock spring vise provides the excuse to buy more rifles ...

The best polishing material I've found is a Dremel diamond-impregnated rubber drum.  A medium grit cone-shaped drum is perfect for polishing the lock pan to a mirror finish, and also all bearing surfaces in the lockworks.