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The Brasser Phenomenon: Proof of Remington Over Colt Design Superiority

Do you want proof of the superiority of 1858 Remington revolver design? Here’s an experiment for you. That is, if you happen to own a brass framed 1858 Remington pistol and a brass framed Colt, both of which are in at least good condition.

Load both revolvers with a full 25-30 grain load and shoot each revolver. Repeat a few hundred or a few thousand times. At some point the condition of one of the revolvers will deteriorate considerably.  Which one do you think it will be?  The Remington with the top strap for added support or the open top Colt?  Or do you insist that both will be able to sustain normal loads?

After a few hundred or a few thousand rounds of normal loads, the Remington revolver will still be in decent condition. However,other than being a pretty display gun or a nice paperweight,  the Colt  will be as useless as tits on a boar hog. The arbor will be loose and the recoil shield battered.

Hey, I ain’t knocking the almighty Colt or its design. I am just pointing out an obvious fact. When a softer metal such as brass is used to make the frames of Colts and 1858 Remingtons, only one design can withstand normal use. I’m not knocking brasser Colts either. They are fun to shoot and as long as you don’t mind having to reduce the loads to compensate for the structural deficiencies, fire away.