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Author Topic: 1862 Police purchase  (Read 2970 times)

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Offline mike116

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1862 Police purchase
« on: May 03, 2015, 10:06:04 PM »
I finally found an 1862 Police model (not the huge Pietta) at an acceptable price an condition.  It is made by Uberti and imported by Replica Arms Inc.  Came with a box and paperwork which is pretty amazing since the revolver was made in 1965.  The Older Uberti guns were very nicely made when compared with some of the more recent ones.
The paperwork makes for some interesting reading too.





Offline G Dog

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2015, 10:52:07 PM »
One of the prettiest guns ever made.  That would be a five shot would it? Historically accurate.  Great score!!




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Offline mike116

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2015, 11:08:48 PM »
Thanks G Dog,  yes a five shot and I agree.   One of the best looking revolvers ever made.

Offline Mad Dog Stafford

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2015, 05:38:48 AM »
I like it!  ;)
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Offline Pat/Rick

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2015, 08:32:14 PM »
Neat looking revolvers! I've kinda lusted for one for awhile now.  I was looking at a local vendors website tonight, "The Gun Works, Muzzleloading Emporium", and they have a Uberti '62 police in stainless listed for $375.00 ! I still have a few ahead of this on the to get list .                                                                                                                                                                        These folks have a pretty good selection of arms and other items conducive to the BP hobby.
Nothing expresses Liberty more, than the report of a rifle shot fired in the defense of Freedom.

Offline Boondock

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2015, 08:57:27 PM »
Mike, that's just beautiful!  Assuming that's the 6.5" barrel version?  I'd be partial to the 4.5" or 5.5" myself, but yours is quite drool-inducing.  Any chance you'd be willing to post up some of that literature for our perusal?

These folks have a pretty good selection of arms and other items conducive to the BP hobby.

Indeed they do, I've been looking at their quite affordable 'hawks for a while now.
Audentes Fortuna Juviat

Offline mike116

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2015, 10:07:49 PM »
Mike, that's just beautiful!  Assuming that's the 6.5" barrel version?  I'd be partial to the 4.5" or 5.5" myself, but yours is quite drool-inducing.  Any chance you'd be willing to post up some of that literature for our perusal?

I'll try to find time to make a PDF and post them up.   It's mostly advertising from the 60's but it is fun to look at.   Some of the replicas they were marketing then would be a great find nowadays.

Pat/Rick...  You would fall over if you knew what I paid for the '62 Police.

Offline Omnivore

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2015, 11:29:06 PM »
I have one of the recent Uberti's, and yes; it came with a long list of little problems.  I do believe the the Colt police is one of the "coolest" percussion guns ever.  Fantastic find there, Mike.

Offline Pat/Rick

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2015, 06:30:46 PM »

Indeed they do, I've been looking at their quite affordable 'hawks for a while now.
[/quote]


I have an H&B Forge 'hawk and really like it!   I'm sure the hawks these guys sell are good as well!  They used to show up at the Portland, OR gun shows but quit going. I've seen some there and they look like good quality.

(Sorry about the thread Hijack  Mike)
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Offline Dellbert

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2015, 10:59:22 PM »
That's a fine looking 62 Police Mike. (T^ It being made in 1965 makes me want to ask are you going to fire it?
If it's not broke don't try fixin it.

Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2015, 02:02:44 AM »
I have one of the recent Uberti's, and yes; it came with a long list of little problems.  I do believe the the Colt police is one of the "coolest" percussion guns ever.  Fantastic find there, Mike.
Omnivore,
            I'm seriously considering buying a new Uberti 1862. I'd be very interested in hearing the "long list of little problems" that yours has.
Brad Potter, hardware junky.

Offline ssb73q

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2015, 06:08:34 AM »
I have one of the recent Uberti's, and yes; it came with a long list of little problems.  I do believe the the Colt police is one of the "coolest" percussion guns ever.  Fantastic find there, Mike.
Omnivore,
            I'm seriously considering buying a new Uberti 1862. I'd be very interested in hearing the "long list of little problems" that yours has.

Hi Brad, the Uberti 1862 I recently purchased had metal filings in the action and like all the recent Uberti Colts the barrel/cylinder gap was dependent on how hard you pushed in the barrel wedge. Recent Pietta Colts have the barrel/cylinder gap properly set by having a correct length arbor. One needs to lengthen the Uberti arbor (I epoxy brass washers to the arbor end and then file until a perfect gap). see:



The Uberti 1862 (actually an 1849 frame) has terrible cap sucking problems. There are no conversion cylinders available for the Uberti 1862 and extra cap and ball cylinders are expensive.

While there are some issues with the Uberti 1862, the Uberti is the only manufacturer of an official sized 1862. It is also available in two forms, the Police and the Navy. I have ordered the Pietta 1862, but will call it an 1861 Colt because it best fits that sized handgun. The Pietta 1862 can use 1851 38 Colt (38 Special) conversion cylinders.

Regards,
Richard
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Offline mike116

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2015, 07:01:25 AM »
That's a fine looking 62 Police Mike. (T^ It being made in 1965 makes me want to ask are you going to fire it?

Yes Dell,   I will be shooting it after I disassemble it and make sure all is in order.  Everything seems very good but since it has not been fired before it will need some lube inside and some cleaning up I'm sure.

Offline Omnivore

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2015, 02:41:05 PM »
YB Brad; I have several photos, and have been waiting until I have the "whole story".  With so many other projects going I haven't got back to the Uberti '62 for a long time.

I'll do a lengthy write-up at some point, but in short, from what I can recall;
Just as ssb said; all Ubertis seem to have short arbors (or deep arbor bores in the barrel) so the wedge never tightens unless by locking the cylinder.  There is strong evidence to suggest that Colt did this knowingly back in the day, at least on some of his guns.  Still It's a problem.

Further; the cutout on the arbor, what fits the wedge, has a step in it, such that the wedge impinges not on a flat surface, but on a double surface, and that has been peening a notch into the forward edge of the wedge.  If I file out the double step in the arbor slot, it'll effectively widen the slot, meaning I'll need a new, wider wedge.

The front of the frame, which engages the barrel where the alignment pins are, has some protrusions around one of the pins.  Those protrusions (machining defects) have been peening into the barrel around the pin hole on one side, meaning that my POI has been shifting to that side over time.  I didn't notice those last two defects until after I'd fired the thing on several outings, otherwise I'd have refrained from firing it until I'd had them corrected.

The front sight, as per usual, was waaay too low. Some people take that as being historically correct and so they don't do anything about it.  I don't want a gun that needs eighteen inches of "Idaho elevation" to hit anything at ten paces, and so I've replaced the front sight with a dovetailed nickel silver blade sight.  Fortunately I haven't tried to do the final zeroing, because I have those other problems to correct first.

"Cap sucking" only partially describes what happens when you fire a round.  That's only part of the story, and several people including Mike Bellivieu (sp?) who has a prominent Youtube presence in the cap and ball world, have missed the nuance of it.  Yes; the hammer spot for the safety pins can help grab the cap and pull it off, but what's being missed is the fact that the little, lightweight hammer is being blown back and the cap is being blown back with it.  The result is that, after the shot is fired you have the hammer resting on a cap down in the hammer channel before you even touch the hammer to re-cock.  It's more like "cap blowing" than "cap sucking" then, see.  Replacing the nipples with ones having smaller flash holes (Tresos in my case) went a long way toward mitigating that problem.  It went from having a cap under the hammer after nearly every shot, to having it maybe once in ten shots, just by replacing the nipples.  Lighter loads with roundball then of course have less tendency to blow caps than stouter loads with conicals.

Oh; I had to open up the loading cutout before I could use soe of my 36 conicals, and again; it's a common Wap trait.

Bellivieu's (sp?) treatment of filling in the hammer notch entirely does apparently work, but I intend to solve it and still have my safety pin feature intact.  There are at least two things to try.  Filling the hammer notch, and then, before the epoxy hardens completely, force the hammer into one of the cylinder pins, creating a tiny, round hole in place of the large, rectangular notch in the hammer.  The other cure is to install a vertical, steel pin in the top of the hammer channel in the frame, just behind the cap.  The hammer notch is then deepened accordingly, and at that point the pin in the frame absolutely prevents caps moving backward, and you still have your safety pin feature.

Another issue is spent caps jamming on the frame just to the right of the hammer notch.  The photos of originals I've seen seem to show a much larger cap clearance cutout in the top right hand portion of the recoil shield, which would accommodate spent caps better.  I may at some point open that part of the frame up a little.

The wood grip was horribly proud of the metal in several places, and it was very uncomfortable to handle what was otherwise a very attractive and sweet little gun.  I spent a good deal of time taking down the wood, and now you can't feel where the wood ends and the metal begins.  That is possible because of the all-brass grip frame - you take wood and metal down together, and do all the finishing with the whole thing assembled.

The cylinder face has deep tool marks, and thus the cylinder gap is significantly wider at some points and narrower at others.  This I will not bother with, but it is a bit tacky on Uberti's part.

As with all Wap guns I have, the trigger guard cutout, where the trigger comes through, had razor sharp edges, and the finish inside the guard was rough as a cob.  I've worked it down some, but to get it really nice, with clean lines and all, would take hours.  Lots of other sharp edges here and there on the gun, which again is par for the course with the Wap repros.  trigger work is also in order, but that'll come last, and maybe with more use it will smooth up enough that I won't mind the creep.

The loading lever latch didn't have enough travel within the lever to keep the lever from flopping around a bit.  It never came unlatched during firing, but it just flopped and rattled while handling, which was annoying - a respectable gun doesn't have personality defects like that.  Knocking out the retaining pin, removing the latch, and filing a deeper notch in it solved that.

Sorry if I hijacked the thread, Mike; it is still about 1862 Colts though.   :)

Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: 1862 Police purchase
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2015, 03:51:01 PM »
Richard and Omnivore,
                            Thanks for detailing all the issues with the 1862 reproductions. Sounds like they qualify as real "project" guns. They are however such little beauties that I'll probably still go ahead and get one. Johnnie Roper, go ahead and call me a fool, you're probably right. I love a good project.
  I did buy an 1860 Uberti last year and it does have the same problems with the arbor being too short and the wedge not pulling back the barrel all the way. That was easy to solve by tapping the tip of the arbor 8-32 and installing a binding head screw. The screw can be adjusted so it's head controls where the barrel is drawn back to and the tip of the screw protrudes through the arbor slot and establishes the wedge fit.
Brad Potter, hardware junky.