Author Topic: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block  (Read 2609 times)

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Offline eahka

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Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« on: March 19, 2015, 11:43:12 AM »
Can you please help me ID this Rolling Block.

I cant find a serial number anywhere on the rifle
The tang on top of stock has the following;
Remingtons Illion NY
Pat . May 30th Nov 15th 1864
April 17th 1886
Aug 23 1867 Nov 7th 1871

Left side of frame has a Upside down letter P connected to a letter H
Letter U on the front barrel band
Top of Butt Plate;
84
F
32
4

Barrel at muzzle measures .498" and at end of chamber measures .556"
Barrel length muzzle to frame is 22". 
The bore has sharp rifling and is generally shiny with a few dark spots.

The rear sight on left ear has graduation numbers 1 2 3.  On the flip up sight rear are the graduation numbers 4 5 6 7 8

I do not find any inspector cartouches on the stock

There is no blue or case hardening any where on the rifle, NO RUST whatsoever, just pewter like patina.  Hammer and Rolling breech block tabs have perfect checkering.

From reading, I wonder is this could be a New York State Militia Carbine.  It has the 22: bbl, Last Pat Date 1871, 1/2 cock safety, Hammer has high spur, Breechblock spur is horizontal and both are checkered not cross hatches.  But I leave that to the experts here to help me understand what I have

What model Rolling Block do I have ?  What is caliber based on the above measurements.  Any idea of its date of birth.  What branch of Military used these rifles ?  Any anything else you can tell me.  Any guess at its value  Picture attached

Thanks
Eahka



Offline mazo kid

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2015, 11:47:59 AM »
Does the hammer go to half-cock when you close the breechblock?

Offline eahka

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2015, 12:06:20 PM »
Yes, when you close the breech block, the hammer drops to safety/half cock.  I expected the hammer to drop a lot further to a half cock.  But it does drop a little and the gun is safe, will not fire.  You have to pull the hammer back a little ways to go off safe to fire condition.

Eahka
« Last Edit: March 19, 2015, 12:59:52 PM by eahka »

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2015, 01:16:48 PM »
Your carbine would not be the NY State version then, as those were specifically ordered with the safety feature of the hammer automatically dropping to half cock upon closing of the breech block. They were also in 50-70 caliber. You do not specify your bore. However... there seems to be a bit of enigma here. Most carbine barrels were 20" or 24" IIRC. What is the OAL of your gun? Pictures would be nice!  {?|  Does your thumb lever on the breech block stick straight up or does it stick out to the side? Sling swivels or not? I am definitely not an expert but have references and some rifles here. My carbine is in 7mm caliber.

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2015, 03:00:19 PM »
Ah-ha, I see you have edited your previous post. So....you do have the NY State carbine, making it a 50-70 caliber. This gun was in use from about 1870 until the mid-1890s. I'll send you a page of info if you would like, either by PM or email if you let me know your address.

Offline eahka

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2015, 07:53:57 PM »
Mazo Kid;

Yes, please send me the info you have  ks2krpt@attglobal.net

Do you or anyone know how to decode the butt plate marking;
84
F
32
4
Stamped on the butt plate in order as shown.  I have searched the web, but come up zero on decoding that info.

Thanks
eahka

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2015, 11:06:26 PM »
OK, I'll send some info tomorrow. Have you tried www.remingtonsociety.com?

Offline mazo kid

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2015, 11:09:22 PM »
Also, IIRC, the serial number will be stamped on the left side of the lower tang. You will have to pull the butt stock off to read it.

Offline Gunslinger9378

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Re: Please help me ID this Remington Rolling Block
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2016, 08:43:25 PM »
Gentlemen,
            Sounds like the identical Weapon that the famous Cattleman, Nelson Stroey, outfitted his men with when they drove a herd of Longhorns all the way from Texas to Montana.  He had about 30 Cowhands, and he otfitted them with .50-70 Carbibes, abd percussion revolvers.  When they got to Fort Phil Kerney, Col Carrington, ferful for their safety, forbade then to go any Further. There was a dance at the fort that night, so leaving a skeleton crew to guard the cattle the rest of the men Swng the
  Officers & Non-coms wives, then gradually slipped away one by one! When the Fort awoke the next Morning, the herd was gone.  Stoey got the herd to Montana, by driving at night, and fighting the Indians off during the day.  Many years later, Elmre Keith had the chance to meet Nelson Storey. Said he was a grand Old Gentleman.  Descendants of the Storey Family, still live around Boseman. Apparently Storey told Keith, that with the 50-70 rifles, you could always tell when you hit an Indian, for he would do a back somersault backward off his pony, and there would be a noise, like slapping a pony across the rump, with a wet slicker!
                                                                                                      Johnnie Roper;Alias:Gunslinger9378.
Never make the mistake of thinking I will not shoot..........
Because it may be your very last mistake!