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Author Topic: Snub  (Read 4643 times)

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Offline ssb73q

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Re: Snub
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2015, 12:49:18 PM »
Hi, this is my solution for a .45 Colt snub, my stainless steel revolver has a vented barrel and laser grips installed, see:
http://www.taurususa.com/product-details.cfm?id=649&category=Revolver&toggle=&breadcrumbseries=

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline Yolla Bolly Brad

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Re: Snub
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2015, 01:27:46 PM »
  My "practical" snubbie is a stainless Charter Arms Bulldog 44Spl. However, I still want to build one out of an 1858.
Brad Potter, hardware junky.

Offline ssb73q

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Re: Snub
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2015, 06:43:35 AM »
Hi, Mike shoots his new snub, see:



Look at that cylinder bolt scratch line, it seems like Mike's snub has a serious bolt timing issue? Looking at the reliability of his snub, it seems proof that taking a hacksaw to a perfectly good 1858 has unintended consequences.

Regards,
Richard
There’s nothing better in the morning than the smell of bacon and black powder smoke!

Offline Pat/Rick

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Re: Snub
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2015, 07:31:21 PM »
I wonder if the "turn ring" is just from dragging the bolt while rolling the cylinder in and out of the frame?
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Offline Boondock

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Re: Snub
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2015, 12:34:18 AM »
Look at that cylinder bolt scratch line, it seems like Mike's snub has a serious bolt timing issue? Looking at the reliability of his snub, it seems proof that taking a hacksaw to a perfectly good 1858 has unintended consequences.

I wonder if the "turn ring" is just from dragging the bolt while rolling the cylinder in and out of the frame?

To Richard's comment specifically, I don't think it has much to do with timing at all - purely operator error in my eyes, which I will address below.  Also, the function issue was due to cap jams caused by a lightened mainspring not holding the hammer down on the spent caps, causing fragments to fall into the action - the reason he had to manually rotate the chamber into battery several times near the end of the video.  Notice how in one session he only put two rounds into "Evil Roy" before he cut frame and magically had another 5 shots waiting for freshly painted targets?  I'm betting he spent some time with a nipple pick and didn't tell us!  That hacksaw had nothing to do with the performance of the gun, save the accuracy and FPS differences between a 2" and 8" barrel.

Addressing Pat/Rick's point, I had to watch Mike's cylinder removal/replacement several times to figure out what's going on.  Take a look at the still picture at 1:19 and see how jagged that drag line is?  Also seems that he's peening the cylinder slots. UGLY! 

I think it has to do with the fact that he removes/replaces the cylinder at half cock. At half cock the hand spur still engages the sprocket on the rear of the cylinder.  He doesn't bother to try seating the bolt first, but rather tries to align the hand spur first.  He rotates the cylinder into the frame clockwise, which will push up the hand, but at the same time will make the bolt drag until it finds its way into a slot.  He does exactly that at 5:00-5:08 in the vid.  I think I can even hear the scrape of the bolt on the cylinder as he twists it in! (Or was that his poor Remmy screaming in pain??)  I like the majority of Mike's videos, but that one made me sad.

When I remove a cylinder, I pull the pin forward, slightly tilt the gun to the right side, pull the hammer back about 1/4" (both dropping the bolt slightly and retracting the hand spur) and she drops right out.  To replace, again I draw the hammer about 1/4", line up the bolt with a notch, and roll the cylinder counter clockwise to seat. Drop the hammer gently on an uncapped nipple, seat the pin, and you're done. Easy peasy, with no drag lines or peening of the bolt slots.

Case solved.

Yours truly,
Boondock
« Last Edit: April 14, 2015, 12:47:10 AM by Boondock »
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Offline Gunslinger9378

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Re: Snub
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2015, 05:04:14 PM »
Dear Friends,
            Duelist's ingenuity has produced a gun that loooks good, apparently is reasonably Accurate, and the alterations don't
appear to have materially altered the acuracy potential.  At ultra short ranges the weapon would appear to have some merit!
The Concealability angle is another matter.  I (As I have mentioned before.) am  LITTLE GUY! On the bathroom scales, after stepping out of the shower, I weigh about 157 lbs!  My height used to be 5'-8", but with age I seem to have shrunk an inch!
            I have NO DIFFICULTY WHATSOEVER, IN CONCEALING COMPLETELY, A REMINGTON'S SHERIFF'S MODEL WITH THE 5.5" BARREL!  The advantages I have over the snubbie are many!  #1. I have a full sized butt grip to hold onto, making the gun more stable in my hand, and assisting me in holding the gun steady while I aim. #2. The longer barrel gives me an extended sight radius, so my accuracy will most likely be enhanced!  #3.  The longer barrel gives my power charge more time to develop a faster velocity, and the faster velocity bullet, especially if made of pure soft lead, the more damaging will be the effect on ones enemy! #4. I am very familiar with my Sheriff's Models, and it is well known, that one shoots better with a gun that one is very familiar with! And lastly, #5.  Even tough I am a Small Man, I can carry a full-sized Sheriff's Model, so well concealed, that NO-ONE, save for the occasional Police Officer, (Who are trained to look for things like concealed guns!)
has ever discovered that I am carrying a gun!
            So it would seem, that as far as practicality is concerned, the Remington Cap & Ball Snubbie, is a solution to a problem that, "DOES NOT EXIST!!!"  If, "Little Old Scrawney Me,"  can very adequately, and  completely conceal on my small person, what is in effect, a full sized revolver, with a five and one half inch barrel, what utilitarian gap, does the Snubbie fulfill?  Someone's flight of Fancy perhaps? In addition, the Snubbie MUST result in a loss of velocity.  (Due to the very short barrel?) The Snubbie is, (Or WAS?) designed to take care of trouble at very short ranges!  With my PDL, I can generate a velocity of over 900 fps.  If I was facing an enemy who was bigger, tougher, and Meaner than I, (Which would describe about 95% of the male population in The United States!) Then I would want a weapon in my hand that would deliver a very decisive blow!  So far, no-one to my knowledge, has yet chronographed a Remington Snubbie with as barrel of three inches or less!!! Some of you gentlemen have made what are probably educated guesses, but an educated guess is not what I am prepared to risk my life on!  Because my friend Richard chronographed my PDL in a Sheriff's Model identical to my own, I KNOW that any .457 ball, I send toward a person I am convinced wishes me harm, WILL BE MOVING AT BETWEEN 922, and 985 FEET PER SECOND, and at the lowest velocity, WILL strike with about 270 ft.Lbs. of Kinetic energy! 308 ft.lbs for the fastest ball!  I realize that this is still slower that the legendary .45 ACP Round of Slab-Sided-Varmint Fame, but I consider that the pure, Soft Lead Ball, WOULD do more internal damage to a specimen of Homo Sapiens, than a copper Jacketed bullet, that would most likely retain most of it's shape and integrity!
            I shoot my PDL regularly in the desert, and I wear ear plugs AND ear muffs when doing so!  It is very noisy! I would DREAD having to set that Sucker off indoors, with NO hearing protection!  I probably wouldn't hear much for a day or two afterwards!  A heavy load in a three inch barrel would probably be even WORSE!
            I consider that the effort, and the skill put into making these Snubbies, is highly commendable!  It is their PRACTICALITY, as utlitarian weaponry that I doubt!  I personally WOULD LIKE to shoot someone ELSES Snubbie, as long as I had my Ear Plugs AND Ear Muffs handy! AND, as long as it was in a flat piece of terrain, with no nearby hills to echo the noise back at us!
                                                                                     Johnnie Roper,Alias:Gunslinger9378.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2015, 05:10:44 PM by Gunslinger9378 »
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Offline Omnivore

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Re: Snub
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2015, 12:20:47 AM »
Quote
He rotates the cylinder into the frame clockwise, which will push up the hand, but at the same time will make the bolt drag...

Except that when the hammer is at half cock, the bolt should be fully retracted into the frame.  It has to be. How else can you load and cap at half cock?

If the cylinder is acquiring drag lines at half cock, the gun is horribly out of regulation.  Fix it.

I install my cylinders exactly as you describe in the quote above, but since the gun is properly regulated, the bolt never touches the cylinder in the process.  It's impossible, for the bolt is below the "water table" just as it's supposed to be when at half cock.

You see a continuous, severe drag line like that, it means the gun is, or has been in the past, horribly maladjusted.

Kudos to your ability to deal with a maladjusted gun without gouging the cylinder, but the proper solution is to fix the gun.  I'd like to know how you go about rotating the cylinder during loading and capping though, of your bolt drags at half cock.  Do you have to keep manipulating the hammer each time you rotate the cylinder to a new position?  Sounds like a bummer.  Or maybe you miss-typed your comment...

Offline Pat/Rick

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Re: Snub
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2015, 09:43:38 PM »
I asked that because I definently put a ring on my first when learning to replace the cylinder. Had a heck of a time at first. It's a small wonder I didn't break the hand when I over rotated the cylinder enough to get the hand in the cylinder arbor hole. ^y%     M__

I absolutely went full on dummy with that move, and it sure wasn't the first hard lesson I've taught myself. Likely hasn't been the last either. (o&   (?^

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Offline Gunslinger9378

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Re: Snub
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2015, 05:35:01 PM »
Dear Friends,
            The ONLY marks ON THE WALLS OF MY CYLINDERS, are tiny shiny specks, where the bolt rests when my cylinder is locked in the SAFE position, with the hammer in a safety Slot!  Now and then, I'll get a Q-Tip, dip it in my Cold Blueing bottle, and touch these bright speck.  Then they will disappear for a few weeks!  It's usually just Betsina, for she is the one that gets carried the most in my Shoulder Rig.  Clementina and Sophia tend to live in my Double Mexican Loop Rig, cunningly concealed in my Clothes Closet.  Which is also where I feed my Kitty-Kats!  So the weapons have,"Attack Cat Protection!"
                                                                                     Johnnie Roper,Alias:Gunslinger9378.
Never make the mistake of thinking I will not shoot..........
Because it may be your very last mistake!

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Snub
« Reply #24 on: July 02, 2015, 09:09:10 PM »
Quote
He rotates the cylinder into the frame clockwise, which will push up the hand, but at the same time will make the bolt drag...

Except that when the hammer is at half cock, the bolt should be fully retracted into the frame.  It has to be. How else can you load and cap at half cock?

If the cylinder is acquiring drag lines at half cock, the gun is horribly out of regulation.  Fix it.

I install my cylinders exactly as you describe in the quote above, but since the gun is properly regulated, the bolt never touches the cylinder in the process.  It's impossible, for the bolt is below the "water table" just as it's supposed to be when at half cock.

You see a continuous, severe drag line like that, it means the gun is, or has been in the past, horribly maladjusted.

Kudos to your ability to deal with a maladjusted gun without gouging the cylinder, but the proper solution is to fix the gun.  I'd like to know how you go about rotating the cylinder during loading and capping though, of your bolt drags at half cock.  Do you have to keep manipulating the hammer each time you rotate the cylinder to a new position?  Sounds like a bummer.  Or maybe you miss-typed your comment...

I'm gonna side with Omni on this one...I have one Remmy that leaves a consistent drag line, and it's caused by the bolt approaching battery way too early. I can see this by comparing it with some of my others with perfect timing...the bolt snaps an atomic hair before the chamber reaches battery. On my problem child the bolt snaps up maybe two notch widths prior, probably an easy repair if I would take the time to work on it.
A well tuned and timed gun should not behave in this manner.
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