Author Topic: CVA brasser  (Read 4795 times)

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Offline Mike B.

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CVA brasser
« on: November 11, 2014, 12:04:32 PM »
I was recently given this CVA brasser.  The action is stiff, but can still be easily cocked with thumb.  Everything works as it is suppose to.  The pics are fine but I believe they fail to show how the bluing is beginning to thin a bit on the barrel and cylinder.  There is no rusting in the barrel or in the chambers of the cylinder.  If I were to sell the gun, what do you think would be a fair asking price?

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Offline Mad Dog Stafford

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2014, 12:45:29 PM »
Hi Mike, Nice Brasser there.  ;)

Price wise is about $100 right now.
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Offline Dellbert

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 10:08:29 PM »
+1 what Sam said. Not a bad gun actually. :)
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Offline Mike B.

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2014, 08:46:54 AM »
I'm wondering why CVA made their cylinders with the very thin grooves around it.  I think it takes away from the overall look.  The cylinder on my Remmy is smooth.
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Offline DD4lifeusmc

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2014, 09:29:15 AM »
I'm wondering why CVA made their cylinders with the very thin grooves around it.  I think it takes away from the overall look.  The cylinder on my Remmy is smooth.
Just eliminated one step in the machining process, which lowered their cost.
I got a lot of CVA and Investarms and Thompson Center barrels where the marks were left in.
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Offline mazo kid

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2014, 11:27:34 AM »
I don't see "thin grooves", do you mean not polished?

Offline DD4lifeusmc

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2014, 06:01:41 PM »
I don't see "thin grooves", do you mean not polished?
yep not polished. the grooves are the lath tool cutting marks from forming the cylinder.
Doesn't hurt anything  just not as smooth and polished looking.
One of my 35+ year old Navy Arms  is the same way.
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Offline Captainkirk

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2014, 06:58:04 PM »
Mad Dog is right on with the pricing.
The grooves can easily be polished out by threading a nut and bolt through the center, chucking it in a drill press and polishing with emery cloth while spinning.
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Offline Mike B.

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2014, 07:35:09 AM »
Thanks for the info on the cylinder.  I don't think I'll do anything to it. 

Just one more question:  The hammer doesn't cock as easily as I'd like it to.  Don't get me wrong, it's not so stiff that I have to use two hands to cock it but it's stiffer than my Pietta steel frame.  I've backed out the mainspring screw and it doesn't seem to make a difference.  I've disassembled the entire revolver, cleaned and checked every part for smoothness and it's still a bit stiff.  Any suggestions?  The trigger pulls easily and smoothly...no problem there.
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Offline Len

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2014, 09:48:59 AM »
I also notice that the bolt leaves a ring round the cylinder, as the bolt doesn't retract enough on cocking.

Offline Hellgate

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2014, 09:52:19 AM »
I've made several Remingtons quite manageable by knocking out the heavy Remington spring and swapping in a Colt '51/'60/SAA mainspring. You may need to trim the end if it is a little too long. The Colt spring sits at a slight angle and puts less tension on the hammer. Works for me. Some of those Remmy springs come out of old Studebakers. I just found it easier to switch springs than to try to grind down (narrow) the original springs and then polish the edges.
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Offline DD4lifeusmc

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2014, 09:58:55 AM »
Thanks for the info on the cylinder.  I don't think I'll do anything to it. 

Just one more question:  The hammer doesn't cock as easily as I'd like it to.  Don't get me wrong, it's not so stiff that I have to use two hands to cock it but it's stiffer than my Pietta steel frame.  I've backed out the mainspring screw and it doesn't seem to make a difference.  I've disassembled the entire revolver, cleaned and checked every part for smoothness and it's still a bit stiff.  Any suggestions?  The trigger pulls easily and smoothly...no problem there.
The first thing I would do is open it up and thoroughly clean the insides.  Could just be a little gunny from time.
Check for burs on the parts. Lube with whatever you want. Gun oil sewing machine oil etc. But realize BP and petroleum don't mix well. even though it is not traditional, a little white lithium engine assembly grease works.
Or just plain bore butter liberally applied.  Me?  I use my mix of lard (tallow) and beeswax.

The adjusting screw because of it's location really doesn't do a lot in terms of tension adjustment.
You can remove the spring pretty easily.  File a tad off each edge of spring. A little goes a long way.

yes I know you mentioned cleaning it already etc.  still that where I always start at.
The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps.
General Alexander A. Vandergrift, USMC
to the Senate Naval Affairs Committee, 5 May 1946
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Offline Mike B.

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2014, 10:14:52 AM »
Thanks for the info on the cylinder.  I don't think I'll do anything to it. 

Just one more question:  The hammer doesn't cock as easily as I'd like it to.  Don't get me wrong, it's not so stiff that I have to use two hands to cock it but it's stiffer than my Pietta steel frame.  I've backed out the mainspring screw and it doesn't seem to make a difference.  I've disassembled the entire revolver, cleaned and checked every part for smoothness and it's still a bit stiff.  Any suggestions?  The trigger pulls easily and smoothly...no problem there.
The first thing I would do is open it up and thoroughly clean the insides.  Could just be a little gunny from time.
Check for burs on the parts. Lube with whatever you want. Gun oil sewing machine oil etc. But realize BP and petroleum don't mix well. even though it is not traditional, a little white lithium engine assembly grease works.
Or just plain bore butter liberally applied.  Me?  I use my mix of lard (tallow) and beeswax.

The adjusting screw because of it's location really doesn't do a lot in terms of tension adjustment.
You can remove the spring pretty easily.  File a tad off each edge of spring. A little goes a long way.

yes I know you mentioned cleaning it already etc.  still that where I always start at.

Yep, I shy away from petroleum products, both in my revolvers and rifles.  By filing a tad off each edge, I hear you saying that the main spring needs to be less wide, yes?
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Offline mike116

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2014, 10:27:48 AM »
That is right Mike,   don't mess with the thickness.   File some from each edge reducing the width of the spring.  As DD says a little goes a long way.   Reducing the thickness makes the spring more prong to breakage.

Offline Mike B.

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Re: CVA brasser
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2014, 10:46:03 AM »
That is right Mike,   don't mess with the thickness.   File some from each edge reducing the width of the spring.  As DD says a little goes a long way.   Reducing the thickness makes the spring more prong to breakage.

What are we talking here....a 1/16 inch total...maybe less, then I'll take more off if needed.
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