Author Topic: Max power! (powder?)  (Read 1954 times)

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Offline Roland Deschain

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Max power! (powder?)
« on: July 01, 2012, 05:48:48 PM »
This always seems to be the million dollar question anytime someone talks to me about my brasser, "you dont put too much in there do ya? might bend/break/x/y/z your frame"

so i ask of you other brassers, what powder load do you use and what do you think is the max that should be used in a brass framed '58 remmy?

When i took my Pietta '58 to the range i was pretty comfortable with a charge of 16-20 grains, and out of 12 shots, i only had one misfire (chalking it up to a bad cap, only thing that could have done it) Though with the 12" barrel, i wanted a little more bang from it.....but also didnt want brass shrapnel in my face  (k-

-James
The man in black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed

Offline Roland Deschain

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Re: Max power! (powder?)
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2012, 06:11:03 PM »
sounds decent to me, i was a bit hesitant to push it above 20, this being my first bp gun, didnt want to destroy it first day on the range. i had figured 20 safe because its only 4gr above what pietta says their .44 should be loaded with

-James
The man in black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed

Offline Freedom

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Re: Max power! (powder?)
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2012, 08:30:39 PM »
                          Many import guns come with instructions on loading powder by weight and not by volume, powder by weight comes out lower in grains than using a volume measure. If you are using a volume measure 20 to 25 grains is alright.

I don't think this is true...Pyrodex really threw a lot of confusion into things after it's per-volume data came out. Pyrodex NEEDS to be used on a VOLUME base...but true Black will cross from volume to scale weight to within +/- 1gr..

  I have read inserts from the late 1800's loading info and they spoke of long range competitons and the huge importance of keeping loads weighed exact, and went so far as to list how much vertical stringing you should expect from just volume dumping and being out of semitry only one (1) grain of powder.

I once tested my little brass volume measure and found that, on my electronic scale, that the 25gr volume charge weighed right at 25gr of 3fff. Then to my real surprise I tested it with 4ffff and found that the 4f granulation was the same volume to weight as the 3fff. (Both Goex powders). I thought the 4ffff would weight more on a volume to weight but it does not differ from 2ff or 3fff enought to notice.

To the original question...your brasser is about as strong as the steel frame revolver, at least for the first few shots because the pressure is held by the exact same cylinder as the steel guns...you don't have to worry about it exploding in your face.

But to fully load the brasser will VERY QUICKLY destroy it by battering it apart...just stick with 15gr or a little more and you will be smiling down the sights of your brasser for many years. The occasoinal full load will most likely leave its mark on the frame, but won't result in shrapnel :P
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 08:37:07 PM by Freedom »

Offline Captainkirk

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Re: Max power! (powder?)
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 10:25:29 PM »
It won't "blow up" on ya, even with full-house loads. But what CAN happen is; 1) the frame can stretch and open up, increasing the cylinder-to-forcing cone gap, and causing the cylinder axle pin to no longer want to seat in the aft hole (2) you may hammer the recoil shield, again, opening the gap.
Neither one is good and pretty much relegates the gun to a wall-hanger. They shoot quite well with 20 grains, and I see no reason to push the envelope. If smoke and recoil is your thing, get yourself a Walker.
My steel-framed Remmies handle 35 grains all day long, but a reduced load is much easier to group on paper, wastes less powder and is generally more agreeable. The Bison has a reputation of being a tack-driver and why screw it up trying to be a show off?
"You gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"