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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by bladesmith on May 23, 2018, 04:46:50 PM »
So, how does it happen ? Must be some way it's getting around the ball. I agree with Hawg - not through the nipple hole with a cap off. But, I don't load no ugly wrinkled balls - they go back in the pot. And if you let the mold lay on the edge of the pot while it's heating up you don't get many wrinkled balls to start with. You did teach me one thing - filler wasn't needed even with 25gr charges, I just used two pills. Now a 20gr charge may need a little .
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Fired my 4 NMA's today
« Last post by bladesmith on May 23, 2018, 04:04:03 PM »
I had broken my leg so sitting around I ended up buying a NMA carbine, a Buffalo, and two engraved models, a blue and a nickel one. All were Piettas except the carbine I bought used and all it says is Navy Arms. Anyways, I shot at 15 yards resting my hands on a bench. In the 8" guns 25grs was used with a pill then the ball. The carbine was loaded with 38 grs and a pill. The buffalo with 40grs and a pill. All guns shot were spot on with ragged one hole groups. I was really impressed with the groups and not having to use Kentucky windage or adjust the sights on the carbine or buffalo. I didn't have much time so I only got six shots out of each gun. I shot the 8" guns first, then the carbine, and the buffalo last. I have a number of spouts, so I kept going up in size as I changed guns. The buffalo kicked a bit with 40grs. Maybe off hand I wouldn't notice the trigger guard banging my second finger so much. I'm also going to try 28grs in the nickel platted one seeing how it's a brass framed gun. I'm checking the inside of the back of the frame real close to see if and when the cylinder leaves any marks. Also, I'm gonna have to get one of those eye things to clear up the sights. These 72 year old eyes see two of everything. Anyways, everything went really great and I'm looking forward to the next time out.
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by rodwha on May 23, 2018, 02:57:18 PM »
But if the ball is oversized (or the same size) it would have to cut a trail through the lead or the cylinder wall.
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by Hawg on May 23, 2018, 01:21:30 PM »
I’ve seen the drawing for the theory that a powder trail can be created through the projectile. I must say I am quite skeptical that a grain of powder can dig a furrow through lead. Lead being as hard as it is should, to my thinking, push any powder into the chamber. The stronger material should prevail.

The idea of a chamber being out of round or having depressions makes more sense to me. But then I’m just judging by my sense of logic which has let me down before...

I don't think powder can cut a trail into a lead ball but if you're not neat with your loading powder can and will stick to the chamber wall and be crushed between the chamber wall and the ball creating a trail.
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Gun Handling & Security / Re: Public Ranges
« Last post by Len on May 23, 2018, 12:37:20 PM »
Quoting Omnivore:
".... or doing the Hollywood pistol handling, where you point your pistol straight up into the air and then bring it down onto the target while cocked ......"

According to the laws of physics, a bullet fired into the air will come back down at approx the same velocity as fired (minus some drag)
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by rodwha on May 23, 2018, 12:26:34 PM »
I’ve seen the drawing for the theory that a powder trail can be created through the projectile. I must say I am quite skeptical that a grain of powder can dig a furrow through lead. Lead being as hard as it is should, to my thinking, push any powder into the chamber. The stronger material should prevail.

The idea of a chamber being out of round or having depressions makes more sense to me. But then I’m just judging by my sense of logic which has let me down before...
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Gun Handling & Security / Re: Public Ranges
« Last post by Omnivore on May 23, 2018, 12:02:11 PM »
Quote
Worst I've seen are the morons throwing clay pigeons at an area where the berm isn't nearly high enough for that.

I know of two different trap ranges in WA State where you're shooting directly toward town, which is just a few hundred yards away, with no berms.  The rule is #6 or smaller shot, which has a very short range.  It's just not a problem.  Skipping rifle bullets off the ground in front of a berm is the real danger, or doing the Hollywood pistol handling, where you point your pistol straight up into the air and then bring it down onto the target while cocked.  If you're doing that, and I know many of you are, then you'd best re-think it.  It serves no useful purpose and is utterly stupid and dangerous.  If you think about the required sight picture, bringing the pistol UP onto the target would make more sense, but what is taught by the good instructor is to stab the pistol straight out in front of you, pointed onto the target as soon as practicable.

"Doubling" with a semi-auto is another danger.  That happens when you've developed a habit of pre-tensioning the trigger between shots.  When the rifle or pistol is in recoil it is often pointed up over the berm, and if you pre-tension the trigger just a little too hard, an unintended (negligent) shot goes over the berm and into the wild blue.  Same can happen with a heavy-recoiling double action revolver if the shooter isn't handling it right-- as the gun comes up in recoil, the trigger finger has reflexively come off of it, allowing reset, and the further upward motion of the gun forces the trigger into the trigger finger, firing the gun in high recoil.  People have even shot themselves in the head doing that.  So when handing a hard-kicking DA revolver to a newbie, never have two adjacent chambers loaded.  I suppose a similar problem could occur with a semi-auto.

Then there is the dropped gun, which is far more likely to fire when you try to catch it, than it is if you just let it fall.  Actually there are more ways to negligently fire a gun than one can imagine.

The "cook-off" is another good one.  That's when you've mag-dumped multiple times and over-heated your semi-auto barrel, then you decided you need to go and reset targets, so you leave your smoking-hot rifle on the bench, pointed down range with a round in the chamber.  While you're down range doing whatever you're doing, that round you left in the chamber cooks off, shooting at you with no one at the controls.  That's why a lot of machine-guns fire from an open bolt.
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Gun Handling & Security / Re: Public Ranges
« Last post by valforgettaboutit on May 23, 2018, 11:09:15 AM »
My old "free-to-use" public range in VA was put there by the Park Service. I've had good and bad experiences there but mostly good, nothing to keep me from going back. They did have a trash problem there but locals formed a "friends of the range" type group and cleaned up and freshened up the area about once a month, I used to donate to them as a thanks.

Worst I've seen are the morons throwing clay pigeons at an area where the berm isn't nearly high enough for that, but after reminding them that VA State Police use the range regularly they put it away. It's usually just some nice people sighting in rifles or doing some plinking.
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by DD4lifeusmc on May 23, 2018, 10:09:10 AM »
I use Lyman style handles  on all my moulds. I wear gloves only for the occaisonal splatter that happens.  I can cast a 100 projectiles and the handles aren't hot at all
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1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Chainfire event.
« Last post by Hawg on May 23, 2018, 08:16:10 AM »
I use wrinkled balls. I'm not going to toss a ball back in the pot because of wrinkles. It has been no issue with me.
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