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Author Topic: Now what do I do?  (Read 527 times)

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Offline echo1

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2017, 10:28:37 AM »
Dear Echo-1,
             I had a Remington Carbine for a very short while, I too took  to wearing a bandana over my face when shooting itI I also decided that it did not pack a big enough punch, to risk only Wounding a deer, and having the poor crittur hobble away to die a painfull and slow death,  So I was delighted when a fellow member expressed an interest in buying it from me!  I have NO IDEA what my Medical Examiner's Special Load would get out of the Carbine's barrel.,,,. I strongly suspect it would still not fast enough to make it a reliable Killer!  Also I also suspect that even if one got to the point, where one could reliaibly hit a  Quarter at fifty yards,
if one was aiming at a living creature, "Buck Fever," might set in, and the deer only be wounded! 
            For Hunting in the woods, where close shots are most often presented, I would still prefer to have either a .50 , or even a .54 caliber rifle!  THen even if you did not get a,"One shot Kill," the chances that the blood trail would give you a better chance to follow up on the animal, and get your meat for the Winter!  There is a saying about, Not sending a boy to do a Man's Job!  I would respectfully suggest that when hiunting an animal, be sure to, "Take Enough Gun!" When I hunted Kangaroo i Western Australia,I used a Lever Action Uberti Replica of the Winchester '73. My handloads chronographed out at 1,600 fps. frpm the 24" barrell.  This load would reliably "Anchor" a Roo, giving one time to reach the animal and give it a, "Mercy Shot."  My friend, Sandy Protchard, had a similar rifle, only his was the carbine. His load was in the 2000 fps.range, but it usually needed at least two shots to reliably "anchor," the animal!   The late, Great, Elmer keith, always said that the bigger the bullet you hit the animal with, the better your chances would be of, "Harvesting the Animal!"   Sandy Pritchard and I hunted together quite a lot, and very often, his ":"Kill's," needed "Follow Up," shots to kill them. (Sandy's Load was a 158 grain slug,(Semi Wadcutter.) at slightly over 2000 fps.)  It was highly accurate in his Carbine, but lacked the size and the weight to reilably, "Anchor" an animal the size of aan Adult Kangaroo!
            So if I were you, I'd not use the Remington Carbine to hunt for a deer this Fall!  If you place your shot well, a Good .50 Caliber should, "Do You Right!" (As they say, "Down Uder!)

                                                                                                 Gunslinger9378.

Good enough advice for me. Not even having shot this thing yet I'd thought I'd inquire. I agree with the under sized/under powered assessment. It's not like you can ramp up a load to 2200 fps. A plinker it is.

The LGS that I got this carbine also has 2 .50 cal. BP rifles, a percussion & a flintlock for dirt. If I get my mind made up to hunt with BP, I'll pick up one of those guys. I'll prolly get them anyway, they're very affordable. PAX

Offline Omnivore

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2017, 12:08:14 PM »
The Remington carbine, loaded with full charges and conical bullets, is the equal of modern 45 Colt pistols.  In other words; there's plenty of horsepower there to get the job done.  With a 240 grain bullet in the carbine I get a full 600 foot pounds energy.

Also, with a minimum conical bullet weight of 200 grains (I've used up to 240 grain bullets in the Remington) you're throwing heavier lead from your 44 than a 50 caliber round ball (which is about 180 grains).  That weight gives you plenty of penetration, even though it's going a bit slower, so make sure that penetration hits the things it need to hit inside.

I any case, it's not so much the gun as the shooter's ability to put the bullet in the right place.  A 35 grain bullet placed in the brain pan from a 22 mini revolver beats a 720 grain bullet placed in the gut from 50 BMG any day.  Shot placement trumps raw power.

Understand your prey's anatomy (where to put the bullet for a clean kill), know your personal limitations and operate within them, and you're good to go.

Offline echo1

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2017, 12:30:16 PM »
The Remington carbine, loaded with full charges and conical bullets, is the equal of modern 45 Colt pistols.  In other words; there's plenty of horsepower there to get the job done.  With a 240 grain bullet in the carbine I get a full 600 foot pounds energy.

Also, with a minimum conical bullet weight of 200 grains (I've used up to 240 grain bullets in the Remington) you're throwing heavier lead from your 44 than a 50 caliber round ball (which is about 180 grains).  That weight gives you plenty of penetration, even though it's going a bit slower, so make sure that penetration hits the things it need to hit inside.

I any case, it's not so much the gun as the shooter's ability to put the bullet in the right place.  A 35 grain bullet placed in the brain pan from a 22 mini revolver beats a 720 grain bullet placed in the gut from 50 BMG any day. 
Shot placement trumps raw power.

Understand your prey's anatomy (where to put the bullet for a clean kill), know your personal limitations and operate within them, and you're good to go.

The onliest deer I've shot at or kilt. About 112 yards, slightly down hill. I waited, was patient. Through the left ear out the right eye. Went down to China town. '52 .308 Savage 99F with 2X7X32 Omnivision (period correct). I don't need to hunt for meat, so I've waited for a 4 point or better which are kinda few & far between in the areas & time allowed. PAX





Offline DD4lifeusmc

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2017, 01:17:53 PM »
I got a NIB  lyman trade rifle   54cal    $400 plus shipping
The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps.
General Alexander A. Vandergrift, USMC
to the Senate Naval Affairs Committee, 5 May 1946
------------
Marines Birthday  11/10/1775
USA birthday  7/4/1776

Offline Omnivore

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2017, 03:12:05 PM »
echo1; Nice, clean kill there.  Also; the same hit from a Colt Navy at 20 yards would have killed it just as well (though it would not qualify as legal in WA State due to the caliber, charge and barrel length requirements for a pistol).

DD4life; that Trade rifle is an excellent value.

Offline DD4lifeusmc

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Re: Now what do I do?
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2017, 04:23:03 PM »
echo1; Nice, clean kill there.  Also; the same hit from a Colt Navy at 20 yards would have killed it just as well (though it would not qualify as legal in WA State due to the caliber, charge and barrel length requirements for a pistol).

DD4life; that Trade rifle is an excellent value.

of course it is  I always try to give good value
The bended knee is not a tradition of our Corps.
General Alexander A. Vandergrift, USMC
to the Senate Naval Affairs Committee, 5 May 1946
------------
Marines Birthday  11/10/1775
USA birthday  7/4/1776