Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Starr SA & DA / Re: what´s there to be said for Starr revolvers?
« Last post by Indy4570 on Today at 06:51:27 PM »
I feel your pain, send it to me, you don't want that old thing around!! M__
2
Starr SA & DA / Re: what´s there to be said for Starr revolvers?
« Last post by Racing on Today at 06:46:05 PM »












Well. Guess i ended up with a DA Starr while the forum was down.  =K*
3
Starr SA & DA / Re: what´s there to be said for Starr revolvers?
« Last post by Racing on Today at 06:43:15 PM »
DP
4
I don't think I have ever seen that rifle with a Schuetzen butt plate!
5
1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Ruger's little brother!
« Last post by sourdough on Today at 03:26:49 PM »
Quote

(However, the seal oil I'm familiar with is liquid at room temp.  Nasty stuff, but the Eskimo elders I knew were quite fond of it, and would use it like we use butter, mayonnaise and ketchup.  It's their universal condiment.  They also used it in "poked herring" which is dried herring stored submerged in seal oil.  Excellent nutrition, but it will never win any taste tests except among the elder generations of Eskimos.  Several of their cherished foods made me gag at first, but it does grow on a person.)

Good post, and I am going stay off topic for one post. I lived in Alaska for 35 years (1972-2007) and the Alaska Natives I am familiar with are Yupik, Inupiat, and Aleut. Yes, seal oil is kind of nasty for a white person's palate, but they survived for many centuries in the North with very little veggies (berries, mostly).

Salmon runs were a huge part of the inland Natives' diet. They would gut and split the carcasses, soaked in salt water, and hang them on racks to dry in the sun for Winter food supplies.

They also would take the fish heads wrapped in green vegetation and bury them in the ground until they fermented. They were called "stinky heads". Aerobic fermentation. Never got used to them.

Enter the white man with zip-loc bags in the early 70's. The Natives started using them for the same purpose. But the end product was anaerobic fermentation and botulism was produced. Killed many people until someone got smart and went back to the Native ways.

Sorry to be so OT but I needed to respond.

Jim
6
1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: 35 Grains of Triple Seven 3 f
« Last post by Omnivore on Today at 03:15:35 PM »
Yeah, the "reduce charges by x amount" suggestion for T7 is not about pressure.  Rather it is about closely matching the velocity (therefore trajectory) you've been getting with black powder (so you presumably don't have to readjust your sights, etc.).

In fact, contrary to what some people are tempted to believe, peak pressure and velocity are only loosely related.

To wit; if you were to try to achieve standard velocity with a standard-for-caliber bullet in a 300 Win Mag using a fast burning pistol powder, you'd explode the rifle long before you reached that velocity, but with the right powder, primer and loading techniques you can achieve maximum velocity without over-pressuring the system.
7
1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Ruger's little brother!
« Last post by Omnivore on Today at 02:42:56 PM »
Quote
A sealed action means a "packed with Mobile 1" action  which fills the voids in the frame. That would allow no fouling to enter into the action and also protect the things I've done from the dreaded "tin worm"!!

Ah, I wasn't far off after all.  That does work.  When I got my Carbine a while back, it came packed in white lithium.  It works, but it still had a full, unfired cap inside.

So all you need to so is find some seal fat that's firm enough to stay put inside the action, and it will be "sealed" in two senses.

(However, the seal oil I'm familiar with is liquid at room temp.  Nasty stuff, but the Eskimo elders I knew were quite fond of it, and would use it like we use butter, mayonnaise and ketchup.  It's their universal condiment.  They also used it in "poked herring" which is dried herring stored submerged in seal oil.  Excellent nutrition, but it will never win any taste tests except among the elder generations of Eskimos.  Several of their cherished foods made me gag at first, but it does grow on a person.)
8
Rogers & Spencer / Re: It's here!
« Last post by Indy4570 on Today at 02:38:25 PM »
I got another R&S now and got a conversion cylinder for it, I figured I better since they dont make the euroarms anymore. But one in stainless would definitely blow my dress up :P

I had some american holly grips made for mine, I love the yellowed look of old ivory
9
Rogers & Spencer / Re: It's here!
« Last post by necessaryevil on Today at 02:33:14 PM »
I am having a really hard time resisting buying the stainless Rogers and Spencer advertised here.........................https://www.armas.es/foros/avancarga-y-sus-accesorios-segunda-mano/vendo-revolver-roger-spencer-inox-y-hege-uberti-con-canon-lothar-walter-rebaja-1058631
10
1858 Remington Revolvers / Re: Ruger's little brother!
« Last post by sourdough on Today at 02:30:12 PM »
Hi Mike!

Very clever innovation! Would you consider tackling the same thing on a Pocket Model .31?

A few years ago I acquired (on a whim!) a Replica Arms El Paso Texas 1848 Pocket Model .31 5-shot with a 5-3/4" (nominal 6") octagon barrel with the SB TG (only because I love the look if SB TG's). The manufacture date code is XIX (1963), has all of the proof marks, and I have been told by Dr. Jim L. Davis that it is an ASM first year of manufacture. It has the short frame, short forcing cone, and the short V-notch load aperture, and the rammer pivot screw enters from the right side. All very historically correct.

Bought it from an auction for $275 as is, no returns. Probably a bad decision but I have made those before.

When I received it, it was fairly obvious that it had been shot a few times with the crud I found. All of the screw slots appeared to be untouched. I disassembled it and cleaned it well, and reassembled it. The bolt/trigger spring was only held in place by crud and the hammer would not hold at full cock. I believe the spring has no temper. I bought a replacement spring, but looks nothing like the original spring. The load-lever catch/latch is very sloppy horizontally. I can live with that.

Right now it is just a display wallhanger. If you could perform your magic upon it with your new innovations, at least it would be functional.

If you are game, I would pay shipping both ways, and if it still does not run, it is still a nice wallhanger. I would pay you for any work done at your expense.

Jim



Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10