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ssb73q:
September 12, 2015, 05:52:44 AM

Hi, I recently purchased a new Pietta .44 1851 brass framed revolver, the 1851 Navy Confederate. Since it is a Colt style and brass frame that never existed in history, it won't be appreciated by some. This revolver is simply beautiful, the fit and finish perfect, and the timing accurate. I can't believe I got it for such a low price at Cabelas. I already have a .44 Pietta steel framed 1851, but just had to have this beauty for a special purpose.

A few weeks ago I was talking to Lee at Old South Firearms where he thought that putting a .22 conversion cylinder in a low cost brass framed revolver would be the cat's meow. I agreed and ordered the Cabelas brass framed Pietta 1851 .44 Confederate. Other than the .22 conversions, the conversion host revolver used must be steel framed, a brass frame is the exception for .22s. This is the .22 conversion in my steel framed .44 Pietta 1851:



Ok Johnnie, just for you, my new brass framed 1851:



Regards,
Richard


Mad Dog Stafford:
September 12, 2015, 07:17:02 AM

Richard, i think your Brasser is going to be NICE made into a .22lr!  {?|

I would like to do this to mine. What is the total cost for doing this?


ssb73q:
September 12, 2015, 08:04:27 AM

Hi Sam, assuming you already have a host revolver, it will cost an additional $295-$370 depending on the brand of .22 conversion cylinder. The Kirst is the most expensive, the Howell the least cost. The new Howell .22 conversion that may be released for sale soon has an advantage of a full length .22 barrel. The Kirst barrel is only 2-1/2" long. A longer barrel means more velocity and maybe better accuracy compared to the short barrel.

One additional cost item is recommended, ~$14 is the Wolff 32280 reduced power hammer spring. That spring will produce a 2lb trigger pull and minimize conversion cylinder firing pin mushrooming.

Regards,
Richard


M9Powell:
September 12, 2015, 08:23:12 AM

 In other words 3X the cost of the host gun. I'd buy a single six instead. Or that nice used frontier scout I saw for 300$ @ the last gun show. I don't see how they sell them. It looks very nice, but wake me up when they are 100$, until then I'm gonna sleep through this one


ssb73q:
September 12, 2015, 08:59:10 AM

Quote from: M9Powell on September 12, 2015, 08:23:12 AM
In other words 3X the cost of the host gun. I'd buy a single six instead. Or that nice used frontier scout I saw for 300$ @ the last gun show. I don't see how they sell them. It looks very nice, but wake me up when they are 100$, until then I'm gonna sleep through this one

Hi M9, you miss the point. If all we were interested in was cheap, we would just throw rocks.  )L$ (?^ ->i

The point of the .22 conversion is shooting .22s in a revolver that looks like something out of the civil war era. It has an advantage for newbies learning single action shooting and simply for fun.

If cost was an issue for shooters, Colt would never again sell a SAA for >$1500.

BTW, you won't see a conversion cylinder for $100, they keep their value very well.

What do you think I should name my brass framed 1851? I was thinking, "The Johnnie Special" could work for me.

Regards,
Richard


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