Author Topic: "Remington Superiority"  (Read 67254 times)

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Offline Hawg

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #315 on: October 15, 2017, 09:36:52 PM »
Didn’t some of Colt’s early edition 1860’s have a 7.5’’ barrel and navy grips?

Not to my knowledge on the navy grips. I never heard of such but I have seen original 60's with 51 grips and 51's with 60 grips so I guess they each had their following. There were some early ones that had 7 1/2 inch barrels and some with 7 1/2 inch barrels had fluted cylinders but most flutes had 8 inch barrels.  No, I never tried to swap grips but they're the same frame, the 60 is just rebated for the .44 cylinder so as long as you stay within the brand it should be a simple swap. That's probably a mod I could go for if I still had a 60. The 60 grip is a little too Bisleyesque for me.
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Offline Captainkirk

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #316 on: October 15, 2017, 10:04:33 PM »
Didn’t some of Colt’s early edition 1860’s have a 7.5’’ barrel and navy grips?

Not to my knowledge on the navy grips. I never heard of such but I have seen original 60's with 51 grips and 51's with 60 grips so I guess they each had their following. There were some early ones that had 7 1/2 inch barrels and some with 7 1/2 inch barrels had fluted cylinders but most flutes had 8 inch barrels.  No, I never tried to swap grips but they're the same frame, the 60 is just rebated for the .44 cylinder so as long as you stay within the brand it should be a simple swap. That's probably a mod I could go for if I still had a 60. The 60 grip is a little too Bisleyesque for me.

To the eyeball, yes. But it feels good. No need to worry about 'pinky curling' or any such nonsense with the '60 Army. I appreciate the differences between all the Colt models for what they are. The plow handle goes with the territory of a '60 Army in my book, right along with the creeping loading lever (either ya love it or hate it...I'm sorta in the latter camp) and the round barrel & streamlined look (same deal). I actually prefer the big, honkin' 'all-bid'ness' look of the Dragoon myownself, but to each his own. Owning two of the Armies, I couldn't see my collection without them.

The streamlined, sexy lines of the '60 Army....



The all-bid'ness, no-nonsense heavy mother Dragoon, 2nd model...



...and First...



But of course, we were talking about Remington Superiority, and I do (still) believe the design and function of the Remington of 1863 trumps the Colt open-tops, cylinder pin issues notwithstanding. But the Colt is one hell of a beefy, sexy piece of eye-candy for the BP collector and shooter. If all you ever eat is ketchup, how would you know if you like mustard? Just sayin'... ;)
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Offline Johnno

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #317 on: October 16, 2017, 07:33:25 AM »
Damn,

I have a feeling my BP ''shopping list'' is going to get bigger with time - not smaller :)

FIRST though have to get moved into the new place and start saving some MONEY again lol

Johnno.

PS Some sexy stuff there Captainkirk...:)

Offline BOOMSTICK BRUCE

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #318 on: May 30, 2018, 12:12:26 PM »
Just sayin'...
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Offline G Dog

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #319 on: May 30, 2018, 01:15:22 PM »
Just sayin'...


Point taken and yea, that Colt wedge is there for a reason and needs to stay with the gun.

I read here some years ago that that poor waddie just picked up the barrel, put it back on, reinserted the wedge and finished the stage. 

I’da needed a change of skivvies after that one.  Just sayin’.
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Offline Len

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #320 on: May 30, 2018, 01:17:14 PM »
That was one heck of a boolit!
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Offline Omnivore

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Re: "Remington Superiority"
« Reply #321 on: May 30, 2018, 01:19:13 PM »
Boomstick; the arbor in that photo appears fully intact, so the only way that could have happened is from failure to push the wedge in.  From what I recall of that photo, such is the back story also.

The Remingtons are very good, and the design is quite "modern", but they do have their inherent faults.  The hammer and mainspring geometry causes unnecessary "stacking" of the mainspring during cocking, and the loading lever and plunger design favor the easy removal of the cylinder more than the straight loading of a conical bullet.  The "New Model" Colts (1860 to '62) have neither of those problems, the hammer/spring geometry being well thought-out and the "creeping" loading lever being superior to all others, but of course they have different faults of their own.

I believe that if you get a Colt "Goonerized" you'd be hard-pressed to to find any significant functional differences, (except for that awful, compromised Remington loading system) so you're down to which gun feels the best to you.

It's frequently pointed out that the Remington frame is inherently stronger, which of course it is.  The case can be made however that the additional strength is entirely un-needed until you get into the era of metal cartridges using smokeless powders.  So for the 1860s, throughout the '70s and '80s and into mid 1890s, the greater strength of the Remington was a distinction without any practical difference.

Where there is a truly significant difference in strength is in the straight cylinder of the Remington and earlier Colts verses the rebated cylinder of the Colt '60 Army, but it only becomes significant once you get into the cartridge conversion period.  Most of the rebated 44 Colts, when converted, blew out at the cylinder lock notches, which, when the cylinder is bored through, become paper thin.
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