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Author Topic: Bees Wax or something else, Hmmm  (Read 244 times)

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Offline Zarthan

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Bees Wax or something else, Hmmm
« on: December 11, 2018, 10:34:57 PM »
I got two three pound blocks of a yellow waxy substance, not bad smelling but cant quite be sure if its Bees Wax.
I have a bag if Beesworks pellets that has a very different and bad smell, it does not smell like Gulf Wax or a plain candel that has almost no smell and its not sticky like a toilet ring.
I have no way of knowing its origin as I got it at a secondhand store.

Please help me to verify what it truly is, melt temp, texture, smell, specific gravity, Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...

I guess with 6lb Ill need to find some other uses for it as I dont think I could ever use that many pills for my 1858.
Please enlighten me with your collective millennia of knowledge.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2018, 12:04:23 AM by Zarthan »

Offline Zarthan

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Re: Bees Wax or something else, Hmmm
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2018, 01:38:51 PM »
So I was doing some more poking around and saw that a site I occasionally view has some good information.
Cody'sLab on YouTube did a couple interesting videos on Bee's Vs. Paraffin Wax. 
Some of the clues he shows about the Bee's wax are alot like mine, the fine white oxide fat bloom or mold is on mine too, I will need to look at how it breaks and melts.

Offline mike116

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Re: Bees Wax or something else, Hmmm
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2018, 03:15:42 PM »
You'll be able to identify beeswax after you have handled some for a while.   I agree with the video in that the feel and smell of beeswax is enough to identify it.  The color of beeswax varies a lot so color alone is not a good way to identify it.

Offline Omnivore

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Re: Bees Wax or something else, Hmmm
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2018, 03:57:41 PM »
Pure bee's wax has a distinctive, semi-sweet, pleasant smell, is more pliable than paraffin wax, and can be a light yellow-tan to dark brown in color.  Bee's wax is often sold by hardware stores, in little pucks as a lubricant for wooden dresser drawers.

You can always use it as a reducing agent in your lead pot too, if you do any bullet casting.  It's often referred to as "fluxing," but "reducing" (converting lead oxide back to metal) is the more descriptive term.  Most any wax would be good for that, and bee's wax is great, but pine pitch is excellent.

Also; welcome, Zarthan, to the forum!
But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.   James 1:25 (KJV)

So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.   James 2:12. (KJV)