Author Topic: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.  (Read 6617 times)

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Offline 45 Dragoon

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #105 on: May 17, 2018, 05:48:42 AM »
Omni,
  Lol, I know what you mean about the torsion springs in cars (mine was a '64 VW bug). Most folks think of coil springs more in the compression type mode but when used in a "winding/unwinding" type situation, it's considered a torsion. Yes, the bolt block isolates/supports the bolt and is a huge factor in protecting the cyl locking notches. The  spring itself holds the front end of the block (close enough), the back end has a tail that extends over the unused part of the bolt screw. Throw-by degrades the edges of the notches. Of course, the timing and condition of the bolt head figures in as well.
Works great in all S.A.s  .  .  .  .  especially Remies (here's where this ties in to Racing's thread!  :)

Brad,
 Yes, I wind my own springs. The compression springs used for the hand are bought though. They are harder to make and too cheap to buy!! Lol  Torsions, on the other hand, can be made "on the spot" though I generally make them in batches. This is another set up that might be of interest to Racing as well.

Mike
www.goonsgunworks.com
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Offline Omnivore

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #106 on: May 17, 2018, 11:19:08 AM »
Good stuff all around. Thanks, everyone, for the great information and photos.

Yes; I've made what I will hereinafter refer to as "torsion coil" springs for musical instruments, using "piano wire" (awesome stuff) and winding it around a mandrel.  It's quite easy to do, that is, after you've figured out how many windings of what diameter wire you need for the required performance, and have selected the right mandrel size, such that when it springs back off the mandrel you get the right diameter coil.  The great thing about such a coil spring is that it exhibits a lot more total length than the flat spring or the wire spring replacement that Wolf Gunsprings offers.  Thus the spring is not stresses as much (less flex per unit of length) and thus it will exhibit less "stacking" and also it will have a much longer life span in terms of cycles compared to the other designs mentioned.  A compression coil can be very good also, for the same reasons.
But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.   James 1:25 (KJV)

So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.   James 2:12. (KJV)

Offline Racing

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #107 on: May 17, 2018, 06:31:57 PM »


Piano wire?
Ah. Gun afficiendo might be...rock star first tho.. )L$
DVC - 2018

Offline prof marvel

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #108 on: May 26, 2018, 09:07:36 PM »
Greetings My Good Racing -

Any news on the snubbies?

yhs
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Offline Racing

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #109 on: May 28, 2018, 05:58:35 AM »
Sry to say,no. Not really.
Have used the piece as is a bit...it sure works. But per above i still need to figure this there out with a loading ram of some sorts. I am going to pursue the "R&S/Whitney" take though.
Being able to fill her up in the field simply wins out to me...

From the aspect of a belly gun/snub though i can only recommend the solution. It works and it works very very well. What still needs to be done though is to get to fire the thing with T7 and one of Kaidos 260 grainers.
DVC - 2018

Online necessaryevil

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #110 on: May 28, 2018, 07:44:55 AM »
Like the good professor I am on the edge of my seat awaiting to see the final finished masterpiece.............Use a brass drift and a rubber mallet like I do with the one supplied with my Navy Yank...........Just a suggestion ?

I think that gun with it's short barrel and "birdshead" grip looks GREAT as it is, a real "bulldog" look to it ! In my humble opinion.
 

No need to remove the cylinder to reload using the drift.

I think it is absolutely wonderful how you have resurrected this old fella from a butchered paperweight to an extremely useful and cool looking weapon.

Offline Racing

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #111 on: June 04, 2018, 06:20:07 PM »
Uhu NE.
You´ve got a point. To in turn make sure seating depth will be unison...just turn that drift with a collar i guess.?

Thx for the vote of confidence  :-[
I´ll try and live up to it,you know i will.
DVC - 2018

Offline GrayFox

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #112 on: June 04, 2018, 07:17:25 PM »
I really like that idea of a drift with a collar for consistency.  I would like to have one to use with my '51 .44 sheriff's model that never actually existed, but probably should have.  You could make it adjustable via 180 degree opposed set screws on a sliding collar.  You could go from target load to 30 or 35 grains.  We could really make this thing outstanding by having two threaded heads, one for round ball and one for conicals.  Maybe several different profile conical heads would be needed.  If we followed the US Gov't. contracting methodology the rammer, without optional precision hammer, (separate stock number, of course) would cost more than the basic revolver.  Believe it or not, I used to have to provide technical review of both solicited and unsolicited contract proposals for the Army and this entire package for a weapon the Army hadn't had in service for 150 years isn't too far off from things I have seen.  Still, if you will make a basic collared one at a decent price I'd probably buy one.  GF 

Online necessaryevil

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #113 on: June 05, 2018, 08:16:07 AM »
Uhu NE.
You´ve got a point. To in turn make sure seating depth will be unison...just turn that drift with a collar i guess.?

Thx for the vote of confidence  :-[
I´ll try and live up to it,you know i will.

Yep that's the way to go, provided you always use the same powder charge ? If you wanted to reduce that say for target plinking it would leave you with a gap between the projectile and the powder / wad.

However a man of your talents could easily turn up both a straight and a stepped drift to use as and when you please.

Mine is just a straight drift that comes with the gun. I just hammer them in until they won't go any more. So they must be all seated to a uniform depth as the are sitting directly on top of the powder and felt wad ?

The accuracy I get is excellent with the Navy Yank snub using this loading method.

Offline Racing

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #114 on: July 22, 2018, 09:27:33 PM »
Right.
So there´s good news and bad news.

For starters,i´ve about run this thing into the ground. About tried every load,and within reason,various powders as well as bullets of various weights.

What came to though was...it was about as reliable as a Colt. Cap residue would bind the thing you won´t believe.

One legged chicken...? Nah. Not really. I just took to heart what MIGHT be the culprit why i´ve added material to the cylinder cutout per OEM specs.
As the gun somewhere along the line was converted to a cartridge gun the rear aperture/corners of the cylinder opening had been filed to 90deg angles instead of the stock rounding off.

What i presume has happend here is that thus the cap residue gets somewhere to go WITHIN the frame,and true enough them residues would go between the rear cylinder facia and the frame,in effect binding the revolver up.

Well. A stocker sure as hell doesn´t and as i built the gun back into being a cap n ball gun i had NO idea what so ever along these lines. Goes to show you i guess!!

So out the welder came and i´m still in the process of leveling all this out. We´ll get there shortly though,and i truly expect this to be the remedy of the situation.

Now.
That aside i have to say that the gun in itself has shown me that it indeed is an accurate gun and...when no cap leftovers binds it up it is one serious piece of machinery.
The birds head grip for instance makes the thing a natural pointer if ever. At least to me it does.

In turn.
Loading ram setup. Having played around with this a tad...i´m starting to fail to see a reason for a permanent such installed to the gun what so ever.
Leverage needed to ram the bullets home simply brings that this HAS to be attended to otherwise. As is i´ve simply installed the cylinder into the chromed 58 of mine to load it up.

Hm. I STILL however,from a looks point of view,think the Remington "sail" needs to be in there somehow. If so as dead weight,i don´t care.
But.
A separate means of loading the thing up is called for. Either a piece of drift with set measures (a´la NE´s line of thought) OR a setup that hooks into a pair of fulcrum points.
Now..the beauty here is that the one doesn´t exclude the other.
I´ll leave it with that for the moment.
DVC - 2018

Offline Omnivore

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #115 on: July 22, 2018, 10:53:06 PM »
Quote
A separate means of loading the thing up is called for. Either a piece of drift with set measures (a´la NE´s line of thought) OR a setup that hooks into a pair of fulcrum points.
Now..the beauty here is that the one doesn´t exclude the other.

I'm liking that line of thinking.

Nice project!
But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.   James 1:25 (KJV)

So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.   James 2:12. (KJV)

Online necessaryevil

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Re: The resurrection - aka the birth of a large frame 44 cal snubnose.
« Reply #116 on: July 23, 2018, 08:57:07 AM »
I REALLY want to see it finished completely, re-blued and all.

Just another suggestion........................

Put a hex head grub screw through the "tee" piece on the arbour pin and a countersink or "dimple" in the underside of the barrel to locate and secure the arbour pin in place whilst in use.

I would keep it simple and just load it with a brass drift ?

I have been using an Olive oil SPRAY for cooking to keep the cylinder spinning on the Navy Yank snub. Works a treat, makes the gun nice and easy to clean up afterwards too.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2018, 09:12:17 AM by necessaryevil »